Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for :

  • "Gothic romances" x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

entirely in Ireland, with the main activity of the tale occurring in fifteenth-century Munster and Ulster. Melville's preface explains that its subject matter – the White Knight himself – was a real person: ‘ There were formerly three branches of the family of Fitzgerald, distinguished in Ireland by the titles of the White Knight, the Knight of Kerry, and the Knight of Glynn. The first, which I have chosen as the subject of the following pages, is now extinct ’. 1 The narrative that follows clearly aligns itself with a Radcliffean tradition of gothic romance in

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Christina Morin

critical assumptions shaping our current understanding of both Irish and gothic literary production in this period. Relevant and timely work by the team behind the Leverhulme-funded Lady's magazine (1770–1818) project has added weight to the appeal for scholarship made here. What Jennie Batchelor calls ‘the Minerva Press fiction of the Romantic periodical marketplace’, the Lady's magazine offered its many readers a wide range of literary and cultural delights each month, including short and serialised fiction, some of it excerpts from gothic romances

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

a contemptuous buzzword for the kind of cheap, imitative fictions – gothic romances in particular – that, in the minds of critics, threatened to reduce authorship to mere hack-work. 12 As one of Lane's bestselling female authors, Roche often suffered from the blanket condemnation of Minerva Press publications as cultural trash. Fellow Minerva authors, including the Irish writers Captain Thomas Ashe (1770–1835), Eaton Stannard Barrett (1786–1820), Nugent Bell ( fl. 1817), Alice Margaret Ennis ( fl. 1817), Alicia Le Fanu

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Location the Irish gothic novel
Christina Morin

and gothic literature. Early works such as Dorothy Blakey's The Minerva Press 1790–1820 (1939) and Montague Summers’ A gothic bibliography (1940) demonstrate the range of literature considered as part of a gothic literary tradition in the advent of scholarly attention to ‘the Gothic novel’. Alongside Deborah McLeod's invaluable Ph.D. thesis on ‘The Minerva Press’ (1997), and Franz Potter's The history of gothic publishing, 1800–1835 (2005), this scholarship uncovers many of the texts that have fallen victim both to Romantic-era disdain for gothic romances and

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott
Christina Morin

Price thus views Longsword as an allegorical critique, however ‘politically cautious’, of existing political structures in Britain. 49 Watt, meanwhile, understands the text as foundational in the establishment of what he calls ‘the Loyalist Gothic romance’. 50 Such fiction, Watt explains, concerns itself with ‘an unambiguous moral and patriotic agenda’ in the wake of the Revolutionary War in America and in the face of ongoing concerns about France. In this scenario, Leland's novel is undeniably conservative, not subversive, and is aimed, like Clara Reeve's later

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction
Christina Morin

Earl Strongbow as an amusing publication able to teach its readers much about the past: ‘we have been entertained with the tale. It is not an eventful story to please general readers; but we think many will be instructed in some points of history by it, and particularly in the manners of their ancestors’. 4 The Gentleman's Magazine , in contrast, emphasised the novel's romantic quality, introducing Earl Strongbow as an ‘imitation of Gothic romance possess[ing] a degree of merit which ought not to pass unnoticed’. 5 And, where The Critical Review had found the

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
White male vulnerability as heterosexual fantasy
Susanna Paasonen

. Meanwhile, ‘Love enables the pressure of desire’s aggression to be discharged within a frame of propriety’ (Berlant, 2012: 25). All this finds an incarnation in the damaged, needy Christian haunted by memories of his mother, practising structured BDSM routines as a means of self-​therapy and moving into the security of proprietary monogamy in the course of romance. FANTASY BEYOND TRAUMA In her analysis of the series, Illouz identifies it as a genre hybrid combining Gothic romance with self-​help. For Illouz (2014:  30), it primarily offers a social fantasy rather than a

in The power of vulnerability
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

up by subsequent writers. 48 In relocating Otranto as a hybrid of political parody and Gothic romance by a creator self-consciously playing with the notion of real progenitors, I argue that later works by Radcliffe can be understood as creating, rather than reacting to, configurations of father–daughter incest that function very differently from Walpole’s representation of violent incest. 49

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Thefts, violence and sexual threats
Jenny DiPlacidi

: ‘the plot of the Gothic romance is a threat to primogeniture, the arranged marriage gone wrong through the advent of a desire that proves literally unruly’. 51 Miles argues that unnatural sexuality characterised anything that resisted the institutionalised discourses of marriage and procreation in the eighteenth century. In Parsons’s novel the sexuality that withstands marriage is Matilda’s; her

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

sexual openness and sexual suppressions that are built generally into the structure of the book’. 121 After she rejects her sexless, icy cousin it is to Rochester and his fiery nature that Jane runs and she is rewarded for her rejection of endogamic celibacy with a virile and masculine lover. DeLamotte argues that ‘the ideology of Gothic romance idealises female passivity and dependence. At the crucial

in Gothic incest