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An Interview with Celso Amorim, Former Brazilian Foreign Minister
Juliano Fiori

seminar on democracy in the coming weeks, motivated by Lula’s situation. The seminar was the suggestion of Dominique de Villepin, who was French foreign minister and prime minister during the government of [President Jacques] Chirac. Villepin is a republican in the French sense, a democrat, but he isn’t a man of the Left. He recently said to me, ‘The world misses Brazil,’ because Brazil was bringing a soft power that isn’t only for its own benefit. As soon as we put our house in order… sure, it is clear that we need to stop cutting down the Amazon

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Jocelyn A. J. Evans

this ‘diversity’ led to its absence from the second round. Moreover, to criticise Jacques Chirac for only winning 19 per cent of the vote and yet still win rather misses the point: Jacques Chirac has remained remarkably stable in his vote between 1981 and 2002, always winning between 18.0 per cent and 20.7 per cent of the vote (albeit this time as the incumbent). It is the other candidates who have collapsed. So the parties have learned that it does make sense to follow the system’s dynamics and cohere even when personalities, organisations and ideologies are not

in The French party system
Andrew Knapp

8 From the Gaullist movement to the president’s party Andrew Knapp The right From the Gaullist movement to the president’s party Introduction Most major European countries are content with just one major party of the centre-right: Britain’s Conservatives, Spain’s PPE, Germany’s CDU–CSU. France has always had at least two. The electoral cycle of April–June 2002, however, held out the prospect of change by transforming the fortunes of France’s centre-right in two ways. A double victory at the presidential and parliamentary elections kept Jacques Chirac in the

in The French party system
Open Access (free)
The break-up of a party confederation
Nicolas Sauger

more to the right, DL was notably one of the groups where Millon’s network in the shape of La Droite had more success.11 Conversely, New UDF found itself in a centrist position, which allowed it to win the Rhône-Alpes regional presidency, thanks to Socialist support. Nevertheless, the FN split in 1999, which destroyed most of its coalition potential,12 and Jacques Chirac’s continued opposition to any alliance, prevented this new cleavage from becoming entrenched. On the other hand, New UDF itself became more entrenched in the centre in broadening its catchment area

in The French party system
A child of the Kosovo crisis?
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

as the most determined to see the WEU develop real operational capabilities and roles; to the detriment, some suspected, of NATO itself. A developing France-NATO rapprochement , begun under Mitterrand but especially evident from 1995 under his successor Jacques Chirac, thus had the consequence of helping to ensure that momentum was lost in the operational development of the WEU. 19 This is not to say that the WEU was simply

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Alistair Cole

-off against Jacques Chirac. Communists, Socialists, Gaullists, Liberals, Christian Democrats, even Greens performed under par. None of these candidates did as well as they might have expected and many voters were dissatisfied with all of them. The strong performance of the far-left and far-right candidates, the high abstention rate (at 28.30 per cent, a record in any presidential election) 18 The French party system and the general dispersion of votes to candidates not generally considered to be genuine presidential contenders such as St Josse, Chevènement and others

in The French party system
Open Access (free)
Alistair Cole

thing of the past. The front républicain to oppose Le Pen’s second-round candidature and Jacques Chirac’s subsequent call for a presidential majority party all build upon the conjunctural elements which we have already highlighted, but they are in no way based upon any amicable resolution of personality clashes within the right. Nor have the parties suddenly resolved policy differences – these remain in some areas, and in others have been resolved gradually over many years. Chirac has simply found a context allowing him to assert almost total dominance over the

in The French party system
Geoffrey K. Roberts and Patricia Hogwood

President Jacques Chirac (took office 17 May 1995, re-elected May 2002). State structure Unitary, comprising 96 metropolitan departments and 10 overseas departments. Corsica has its own directly elected legislative assembly. Government The president appoints the prime minister and a cabinet (Council of Ministers) of around twenty members, which is responsible to the bicameral Parliament. Executive power is vested in the

in The politics today companion to West European Politics
Open Access (free)
Party system change and electoral prospects
Gilles Ivaldi

. In the first round of the presidential election, the FN has reached its electoral apex by polling 16.9 per cent of the total vote, which allowed its leader to stand in the second round against the outgoing President Jacques Chirac. Together with Mégret’s score of 2.3 per cent, the combined total for the far right added up to 19.2 per cent. In 35 of the 96 metropolitan departments, Le Pen came ahead of the candidates of the mainstream left and right, and achieved a 20 per cent threshold in over 28 per cent of the 555 metropolitan constituencies. In the second round

in The French party system
Open Access (free)
From idealism to pragmatism (1984–2002)
Bruno Villalba and Sylvie Vieillard-Coffre

left 3.6 per cent in 1997) but the Greens lost four deputies from their 1997 total of seven. The instability of the Green vote weakens the party’s competitiveness and in 2002 particularly opened it to the problems of high abstention and tactical voting. The back-to-back timetabling of the elections helped to minimise the importance of the ecology vote in a context where the right was mobilising for a presidential majority in the National Assembly to put Jacques Chirac’s programme into action. Within the left, the absence of Lionel Jospin from the second round of the

in The French party system