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Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest

model to which subsequent Gothic writers adhered or from which they departed. The inclusion of Matthew Lewis’s The Monk ( 1796 ) is essential to disrupt the Gothic genealogy that so frequently reads Radcliffe’s The Italian ( 1797 ) as a reaction to Lewis’s novel without first examining The Monk as a response to and radical departure from the Radcliffean model of sibling

in Gothic incest
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Female sexual agency and male victims

by writers such as Ann Radcliffe and Eliza Parsons, challenges the notion of chaste maternity by revealing the mother as sexually desirable and aligning her rediscovery with her daughter’s sexual awakening. 11 Gothic texts by writers such as Matthew Lewis, William Beckford, Eugenia de Acton and Charlotte Dacre rearticulate this subversion through a queering of desires that creates male victims

in Gothic incest
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Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic

eighteenth- and nineteenth-century criticism in which female writers such as Ann Radcliffe and Eliza Parsons were set up as delicate and timid counters to the aggressive sexuality depicted in the works of male writers such as Matthew Lewis and William Beckford. As E. J. Clery explains: ‘Novels where spirits are not rationalised, the most famous example in the 1790s being The Monk … are “real” Gothic

in Gothic incest
T.S. Eliot and Gothic hauntings in Waugh’s A Handful of Dust and Barnes’s Nightwood

Gothic novel’s fondness for the sacrilegious act – for example, the rape of the drugged Antonia by Ambrosio the monk in the Convent of St Clare that we find in Matthew Lewis’s The Monk (1796) or the staking of Lucy Westenra’s body in the churchyard in Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897). However, like the climax of Waugh’s novel, the final scene of Nightwood offers us parodic Gothic. There is no violence or demonic presence conjured up within the ruined chapel: only its sanctity, already dissipated through neglect, is violated. Thus the only boundary breached is that between the

in Special relationships

Diarmaid MacCulloch, Tudor Church Militant (London: Penguin, 1999), pp. 107–9. 56 Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama the sceptical witchcraft writings of, for example, Reginald Scot. This attitude towards Catholic miracles has a protracted literary afterlife. Long after the Renaissance, Matthew Lewis’s lurid Gothic novel The Monk (1796) features a statue of St Clare in the vault of a convent, a statue which is believed by the nuns to have miraculous powers. Dashing, aristocratic Lorenzo, the Spanish but cryptoProtestant hero of the novel, reveals the

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681
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Location the Irish gothic novel

upsets our conceptualisations of ‘the Gothic novel’ in its lack of the medieval, Catholic Continental settings associated with eminent gothicists such as Walpole, Radcliffe, and Matthew Lewis (1775–1818). It more easily falls into the category of ‘Irish Gothic’, appearing to adhere to prevailing, psychoanalytic readings of the form in its use of the 1641 Rebellion as its setting. Griffith's depiction of this period in Irish history gestures towards the important role Protestant historiography of 1641 played in creating what Jarlath Killeen identifies as the quasi

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction

M. Fitzer names the works referenced here as Gottfried August Bürger's ‘Leonora’ (1774), Robert Southey's ‘Donica’ (1797), Matthew Lewis's ‘The grim white woman’ (1800), Walter Scott's ‘The eve of St John’ (1800) and ‘The lay of the last minstrel’ (1805), Mary Robinson's ‘The haunted beach’ (1806), Walpole's The castle of Otranto , Radcliffe's The mysteries of Udolpho , and Charles Robert Maturin's The fatal revenge; or, the family of Montorio (1807) ( Strathallan , p. 498, n. 61

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange

. 63 This trope recurs in novels such as Smith’s Emmeline , Radcliffe’s The Romance of the Forest (1791) and The Italian , Parsons’s Wolfenbach , Matthew Lewis’s The Monk (1796), Eleanor Sleath’s The Orphan of the Rhine (1798) and Charles Maturin’s Melmoth the Wanderer (1820), among others

in Gothic incest
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Thefts, violence and sexual threats

casting writers like Radcliffe in the role of the heroine beleaguered by male critic villains. 56 Such criticism is not unjust; much scholarship has been devoted to repositioning Radcliffe in light of Matthew Lewis and her male critics such as Sir Walter Scott, while even more has focused on ownership, inheritance and property in her novels. 57 Fitzgerald ultimately links feminist criticism’s fixation on property to a desire to

in Gothic incest