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Open Access (free)
Planned Obsolescence of Medical Humanitarian Missions: An Interview with Tony Redmond, Professor and Practitioner of International Emergency Medicine and Co-founder of HCRI and UK-Med

already there. TRM: That is what UK-Med tries to do, right, taking people working for the NHS who are trained in care as we deliver it in this part of the world and take that overseas? TR: Yes, and the difficulty we face is how to get them released from the NHS to do this, and here again the innovation needs to be conceptual. First of all, and again coming down to consequence , there is enlightened self-interest for our country to let their medical staff do this type of work. Of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Neil McNaughton

entirely free and totally managed by the state. Funding was passed down through a hierarchy of health authorities which fell under centralised control. Up to the nineteen seventies, all seemed to go well. Economic growth kept Health 39 pace with the increasing demands for health care. The only challenge to the system – a shortfall in funding as the NHS was unexpectedly popular so that visits to the doctor and demand for drugs rose alarmingly – was met by the introduction of prescription charges in 1950. These charges for doctors’ prescriptions were the only way in

in Understanding British and European political issues
The Third Way and the case of the Private Finance Initiative
Eric Shaw

highlights its political and ideological importance. The second reviews research findings on the operation of the PFI in the health service. I find that there is little substance to the Government’s claim that the PFI is on strictly pragmatic grounds the most effective way of renewing the capital infrastructure of the NHS – the third section explains why. In the fourth section, by

in The Third Way and beyond
Open Access (free)
George Campbell Gosling

bridged from the other side.’ 6 The hospital serves as a democratic space within which this can happen – but only because financial difficulties remove him from his natural class. The novel is essentially utopian, in that it has to contrive an interruption in the established order to provide the premise on which the events unfold. That established order is the class differentiation we have seen to be a defining characteristic of the pre-NHS

in Payment and philanthropy in British healthcare, 1918–48
George Campbell Gosling

health service. While this was undoubtedly a significant change in the organisation of healthcare in modern Britain, how to understand that change is open to debate. Historians and social scientists have variously understood the NHS as both a rejection and a culmination of what came before. These different narratives cast patient payment in contrasting roles. It was either an important indicator that the voluntary hospitals had effectively

in Payment and philanthropy in British healthcare, 1918–48
Martin D. Moore

managing such illnesses were believed to encounter psychological challenges, discrimination, and often painful long-term complications. For these problems, it was argued, early diagnosis and treatment by a multi-disciplinary team of medical, nursing, and technical staff offered the best solutions. Unfortunately for visionaries like Reid, the tripartite division of the NHS into general practice, hospital, and local government provision made multi-disciplinary and cross-institutional disease management difficult to realise. Reid had, for instance

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine
Martin D. Moore

Although the creation of the NHS had strengthened the role of hospitals in diabetes management, a minority of innovative practitioners began to experiment with more community-oriented care schemes in the 1950s. Clinics and local government health departments co-operated to extend the surveillance and educative reach of clinicians, with nursing and health visiting staff forming part of expanded care teams. With their growing mix of skills, the new teams sought to confront the myriad social and medical problems facing patients with a common

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine
Open Access (free)
Pat Jackson’s White Corridors
Charles Barr

patiently talks him – and us, if we need to know – through the procedures for getting onto a doctor’s list and obtaining an NHS card. His cluster of comic-relief scenes add up to something very reminiscent of the short films of wartime in which the instructional pill is sugared by humour, for instance those of Richard Massingham – right down to the payoff where he breaks an ankle and

in British cinema of the 1950s

This book examines the payment systems operating in British hospitals before the National Health Service (NHS). An overview of the British situation is given, locating the hospitals within both the domestic social and political context, before taking a wider international view. The book sets up the city of Bristol as a case study to explore the operation and meaning of hospital payments on the ground. The foundation of Bristol's historic wealth, and consequent philanthropic dynamism, was trade. The historic prominence of philanthropic associations in Bristol was acknowledged in a Ministry of Health report on the city in the 1930s. The distinctions in payment served to reinforce the differential class relations at the core of philanthropy. The act of payment heightens and diminishes the significance of 1948 as a watershed in the history of British healthcare. The book places the hospitals firmly within the local networks of care, charity and public services, shaped by the economics and politics of a wealthy southern city. It reflects the distinction drawn between and separation of working-class and middle-class patients as a defining characteristic of the system that emerged over the early twentieth century. The rhetorical and political strategies adopted by advocates of private provision were based on the premise that middle-class patients needed to be brought in to a revised notion of the sick poor. The book examines why the voluntary sector and wider mixed economies of healthcare, welfare and public services should be so well developed in Bristol.

Chronic disease and clinical bureaucracy in post-war Britain
Author: Martin D. Moore

Through a study of diabetes care in post-war Britain, this book is the first historical monograph to explore the emergence of managed medicine within the National Health Service. Much of the extant literature has cast the development of systems for structuring and reviewing clinical care as either a political imposition in pursuit of cost control or a professional reaction to state pressure. By contrast, Managing Diabetes, Managing Medicine argues that managerial medicine was a co-constructed venture between profession and state. Despite possessing diverse motives – and though clearly influenced by post-war Britain’s rapid political, technological, economic, and cultural changes – general practitioners (GPs), hospital specialists, national professional and patient bodies, a range of British government agencies, and influential international organisations were all integral to the creation of managerial systems in Britain. By focusing on changes within the management of a single disease at the forefront of broader developments, this book ties together innovations across varied sites at different scales of change, from the very local programmes of single towns to the debates of specialists and professional leaders in international fora. Drawing on a broad range of archival materials, published journals, and medical textbooks, as well as newspapers and oral histories, Managing Diabetes, Managing Medicine not only develops fresh insights into the history of managed healthcare, but also contributes to histories of the NHS, medical professionalism, and post-war government more broadly.