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Emmanuelle Strub

1,700 national employees. At headquarters they had fourteen desk managers to oversee the sixty-five projects. In addition, I was unclear about my role. I had practically no support, though the scope of my job was enormous, from strengthening the overall security framework to providing operational support at one of multiple field projects. What was expected of me? Technical support? Context analysis? Alerts? Operational, strategic and decision-making advice? Or simply reviewing the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rothenburg, 1561–1652
Author: Alison Rowlands

Given the widespread belief in witchcraft and the existence of laws against such practices, why did witch-trials fail to gain momentum and escalate into ‘witch-crazes’ in certain parts of early modern Europe? This book answers this question by examining the rich legal records of the German city of Rothenburg ob der Tauber, a city that experienced a very restrained pattern of witch-trials and just one execution for witchcraft between 1561 and 1652. The book explores the factors that explain the absence of a ‘witch-craze’ in Rothenburg, placing particular emphasis on the interaction of elite and popular priorities in the pursuit (and non-pursuit) of alleged witches at law. By making the witchcraft narratives told by the peasants and townspeople of Rothenburg central to its analysis, the book also explores the social and psychological conflicts that lay behind the making of accusations and confessions of witchcraft. Furthermore, it challenges the existing explanations for the gender-bias of witch-trials, and also offers insights into other areas of early modern life, such as experiences of and beliefs about communal conflict, magic, motherhood, childhood and illness. Written in a narrative style, the study invites a wide readership to share in the drama of early modern witch trials.

Open Access (free)
Environmental justice and citizen science in a post-truth age
Editors: Thom Davies and Alice Mah

This book examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. Debates over science, facts, and values have always been pivotal within environmental justice struggles. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuses of science, while at the same time engaging in community-led citizen science. However, post-truth politics has threatened science itself. This book makes the case for the importance of science, knowledge, and data that are produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. The international, interdisciplinary contributions range from grassroots environmental justice struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, to questions about “knowledge justice,” citizenship, participation, and data in citizen science surrounding toxicity. The book features inspiring studies of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research; different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice; political strategies for seeking environmental justice; and ways of expanding the concepts and forms of engagement of citizen science around the world. While the book will be of critical interest to specialists in social and environmental sciences, it will also be accessible to graduate and postgraduate audiences. More broadly, the book will appeal to members of the public interested in social justice issues, as well as community members who are thinking about participating in citizen science and activism. Toxic Truths includes distinguished contributing authors in the field of environmental justice, alongside cutting-edge research from emerging scholars and community activists.

Open Access (free)
Pleasantville and the textuality of media memory
Paul Grainge

, ‘the sixties’ emblematised the lapsarian moment from which a diagnosis of contemporary malaise took its form and force. In right-wing rhetoric, symptoms linked to the 1960s could include anything from the breakdown of the family and the rise in violent crime, to the emergence of multicultural separatism and the crisis of university education. The liberal-left response, vociferously argued by the so

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Steven Fielding

state education so that it would equal that provided by the private sector.39 Few thought this credible: Stewart and Cole calculated the former would need at least four decades to catch up with the latter.40 As part of the attempt to foster reconciliation within the party, Signposts for the Sixties embraced a radical approach to private education: it fielding ch 4.P65 91 10/10/03, 12:33 92 Fielding committed Labour to establishing an educational trust that would determine how to integrate private schools into the state system.41 As Bacon characterised it, Labour

in The Labour Governments 1964–70 volume 1
Steven Fielding

1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 843,356 845,129 912,987 888,955 847,526 790,192 750,565 767,459 830,346 830,116 816,765 775,693 733,932 700,856 680,656 690,191 Source: Report of the Sixty-Ninth Annual Conference of the Labour Party (1970). fielding ch 2.P65 43 10/10/03, 12:31 44 Fielding Table 2.2 Proportion of constituency Labour parties (CLPs) affiliating the minimum number of members, revised membership and average CLP membership, by region, 1965 Region (in order of average CLP size) Eastern London Northern Home Counties Southern North West

in The Labour Governments 1964–70 volume 1
Open Access (free)
The 1970 general election
Steven Fielding

(1993), pp. 346–54. 14 Wilson, Government, pp. 988–9. 15 A. Alexander and A. Watkins, The Making of the Prime Minister 1970 (1970), p. 152. 16 Boldleian Library, Conservative Party Archive, CCO 130/11/4/7, J. Douglas, The public opinion polls in the 1970 general election, 19 November 1970; The Times, 3 August 1970. 17 D. Butler and M. Pinto-Duschinsky, The British General Election of 1970 (1971), pp. 342, 345–51, 386–93. 18 Report of the Sixty-Ninth Annual Conference of the Labour Party (1970), p. 324. 19 Mitchell Library, Scottish Labour Party papers, TD 1384

in The Labour Governments 1964–70 volume 1
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

, whether old or ill. I hope this letter reaches you safe and legible. Many warm greetings and kisses. Your mother. There follows a short paragraph from Fanny Maier to her family, telling of the sixty-hour unbroken train journey. Poignantly she says that the thought of seeing their loved ones soon lightens their stay, and that they don’t let their courage fail. She reports that there are visiting hours with the men, in the neighbouring barracks. This, I assume is the Fanny Maier from the Offenburg photo. She was to remain Leonie’s close companion through the following

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
New retro movies in 1990s Hollywood cinema
Philip Drake

increasingly serve to confirm history and structure the memorialising of knowledge. Through mediated memory historical events become memorialised through their media representation – remembered by their mediation and remediation – and this iterative process helps to construct a sense of the past as episodic. The recognisable narrative of the past as a succession of definable decades (such as ‘the sixties’ and

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Cultural and political change in 1960s Britain
Steven Fielding

to a formal commitment to nationalisation, Labour was ‘social reformist’ ‘by tradition and practice’, although the balance between the two was ‘constantly shifting’.135 Labour’s course in the late 1950s and early 1960s appeared to vindicate Foot’s assessment. As the New Left writer Perry Anderson noted, by passing the policy document Industry and Society in 1957 the party conference legitimised capitalism, although it assumed an anti-capitalist stance when Signposts for the Sixties was embraced three years later.136 Despite this apparent indeterminacy, many

in The Labour Governments 1964–70 volume 1