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Open Access (free)
Jeffrey Pence

Days (1995) elaborates a future which is nightmarish in its contours precisely as it represents a mediascape in which film is increasingly but one medium among many. This future appears salvageable only insofar as a return to past narrative formulas, linked explicitly to film as the form of these formulas, is possible. For example, in the conclusion of Strange Days a figure of traditional authority, the Los Angeles

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

face to face, as an integral part of the spatial and social dimensions of the media Concluding words 167 increases the understanding of the complexity and temporal resilience that characterise the phenomenon of media scandals. What I have wanted to bring out is the circular character of the food chain where gossip, journalism, the exercise of public authority, and political considerations form an intricate network, without clear hierarchies or directions for the flows of information. In this sense, gossipinfluenced and gossip-dependent journalism is not by

in Exposed
Contemporary ‘British’ cinema and the nation’s monarchs
Andrew Higson

concerns the nature of the portrayal of the British monarchy for contemporary audiences. In particular, depictions of monarchs from different historical periods demonstrate changes in the nature of royal power and authority. These changes can be seen in the differing degrees of narrative agency afforded to different monarchs, and in the representation of the monarch as national figurehead, the spectacle of

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Kerry Kidd

awaken Viviane from her grief and she comes to protest repeatedly against this exploitative rule. Mrs Allistair blames Viviane for the baby’s death, accusing her of neglect. Incensed, Viviane threatens to report Mrs Allistair to the authorities, but is prevented by Allistair’s reminder that, as a criminal associate, she is unlikely to be believed. Shortly afterwards she hears a rumour that Allistair has

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
An allegory of imperial rapport
Deirdre Gilfedder

the unity not only of Britain but also the Empire, itself drawn into incipient conflicts of decolonisation. The anxiety produced by the threat of a vacant throne cannot be overestimated and the core narrative of The King’s Speech is to instate a moral authority, a figure to unite all British subjects, both in the United Kingdom and in the dominions and colonies. The Times echoed this anxiety in

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
History, legend and memory in John Sayles’ Lone Star
Neil Campbell

’. 11 Indeed, the film ultimately questions the rigidity of these borders and frontiers by demonstrating that their apparent authority can be challenged by individual choices and collective, communal change. Annette Kolodny, in the spirit of revisionist history, argued that ‘both geography and chronology must be viewed as fluid and ongoing, or as a continuously unfolding palimpsest’ in which

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

be reconstructed and described. Like most people, I first learned about them through the media. The ethnography on which this chapter is based is made up of telephone calls with key actors, extensive and wide-ranging media materials, material from the authorities, letter and email correspondence, telephone records, press releases, and two recorded in-depth interviews – one with ‘Floorball Dad’ and one with the less well known ‘Floorball Mum’. In the account below they are called the mum and the dad. All private individuals and journalists in the following account

in Exposed
Gumboot dance in South Africa
Dana Mills

: The sequence called Isihamba na Dali (Go with your darling/​girlfriend) is a reference to the fact that, as it was explained by the dancers, it was easier to walk along the street with a woman because two men walking together were instantly suspicious. As far as the authorities were concerned they could be up to no good. (Muller and Fargion 1999: 109) This suspicion by the authorities together with letter quoted at the beginning of the chapter around the miners’ strike of 1920 illuminate the fear that the white bosses felt of organisation among the black miners, as

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
Fixing the past in English war films
Fred Inglis

inaccurately, as the parent-nation in expectation of what parents should give, and that parent in particular: comfort, support, shelter, justice, authority, steadiness, love, trustworthiness. These were qualities which, it was alleged, the British at large and the English as dominant had contrived into the practices of a culture and the formations of a state. Those practices and formations were no doubt

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
The cinematic afterlife of an early modern political diva
Elisabeth Bronfen and Barbara Straumann

politician and Frank Capra’s benign figure of paternal authority, the costume melodramas of the late 1930s and early 1940s displace the struggles of male leaders such as Roosevelt and Churchill onto the figure of the Queen and her political adversaries. 9 Part and parcel of this displacement is the manner in which quasi-historical representations serve to support the war effort by moving into an earlier

in The British monarchy on screen