Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for :

  • "authority" x
  • Manchester Gothic x
  • Refine by access: User-accessible content x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott
Christina Morin

interrupted at the fateful moment by a messenger bearing the news that William is actually alive. His return to his castle instigates a righting of the private and public wrongs committed in his absence – Raymond hangs himself rather than face justice; Ela and William are re-united; their son is returned to them, and, further afield, the king ousts his evil right hand man and regains authority and control over himself and his kingdom. With such a conclusion, Longsword seems clearly to invite allegorical political readings such as those advanced by

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction
Christina Morin

union’ ( The convent , vol. 1, p. 123). The fact is, as Woodville's dependant, even if made so by a false will, Sophia has very little control over what happens to her, as evidenced by her imprisonment in the convent. Even the freedom Sophia achieves by the end of the novel – release from the convent – results in a confinement of another sort – marriage. The only character to be left free of patriarchal authority by the end of the novel is actually the character who at first seems the most ridiculous – Cassandra. Released from her father's tyranny by his death and

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

authority. Griffith's later fiction continues the attention to English treachery evident in The story of Lady Juliana Harley and The history of Lady Barton. Two of the stories included in Novellettes, selected for the use of young ladies and gentlemen (1780) are particularly worth noting in this regard. As discussed in the Introduction, ‘Conjugal fidelity’ appears to confirm stereotypes of gothic Ireland in its focus on a seventeenth-century Irish terrain overwhelmed by ‘storms’ – natural and otherwise – and its detailing of the terrors of the

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Location the Irish gothic novel
Christina Morin

–110. 66 On the masculinisation of the novel in Romantic-era fiction, see, in particular, Ina Ferris, The achievement of literary authority: gender, history, and the Waverley Novels (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1991) and Jacqueline Pearson, ‘Masculinizing the novel: women writers and intertextuality in Charles Robert Maturin's The wild Irish boy ’, Studies in Romanticism , 36.4 (1997), 635–50. 67

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

children of the abbey in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Álvarez points to the importance of the novel not just in the establishment of a gothic literary production in Spain but also in the discourse of Spanish linguistic unity and national singularity. An 1806 translation presented to Spanish authorities as Los hijos de Fitzalán o Los niños de la Abadía was rejected by lay censors both for its lack of literary appeal and its many Gallicisms. 127 The condemnation of the translation in terms of its genre – ‘la lectura de esta clase de composciones

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

disparities reveal that scholarly accounts of two mutually exclusive modes of Gothic incest ignore the interconnected nature of incestuous representations. The formation of male and female paradigms of incest in the Gothic Sexuality, questions of ownership, inheritance, women’s subjugation to male authority, laws of coverture and primogeniture and issues concerning gender roles pervade

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Thefts, violence and sexual threats
Jenny DiPlacidi

of, as Kilgour puts it, ‘cloaking familiar images of domesticity in gothic forms’ in order to enable ‘us to see that the home is a prison, in which the helpless female is at the mercy of ominous patriarchal authorities’. 14 The combination of incest and law serves also to highlight the vulnerability of the heroine in the face of unwanted sexual desires complicated by

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

Delamere proposes again Emmeline refuses him but her birthright and claim to Castle Mowbray is now (ironically) an impediment to a union with Godolphin: [S]‌he reflected on the character of Delamere, and remembered that his father would now claim an authority to control her actions – that one would think himself at

in Gothic incest
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

source of legitimate authority’. 46 Such points evoke comparisons to Walpole’s reign as the father of the genre supported by a tradition in viewing him as such that is centuries old. Walpole’s forged and fake paternity is sanctioned as legitimate, while the maternal contribution to the Gothic has been long denied its status as real progenitor. Genres, like people, must have fathers, regardless of women

in Gothic incest
Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest
Jenny DiPlacidi

relationship’s potential for equality rather than through uniting sibling desires with terror. Representations of this egalitarian potential alongside rejections of paternal authority and the natural development of sibling desires that are frequently couched in legal language cause such relationships to resist placement within the traditional scholarly models of incest in the Gothic. Sibling bonds constitute a

in Gothic incest