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An Interview with Celso Amorim, Former Brazilian Foreign Minister
Juliano Fiori

first time in modern history, the major global power – I am of course referring to the US – doesn’t have a project for the world. It is evident that the US has always defended its own interests, but it always imagined or at least presented its interests – I’m not casting a value judgement here – as linked to a project for the world. Following the Second World War, it was the Americans who assumed primary responsibility for the creation of the international system, starting with Roosevelt. Some international institutions were accessible to all

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Catherine Akurut

the communities within which they reside ( Turchik et al. , 2016 : 143). This would require shifting away from the language that exclusively focuses on casting men as perpetrators and women as victims of violence ( Turchik et al. , 2016 : 137). For example, one of the mechanisms for receiving clients within humanitarian settings includes having the literature about CRSV on display. The language used in these areas for receiving victims

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Arjun Claire

. Solidarity provides a sound moral framework to bridge reason and emotion. It also addresses the flaws of témoignage, which has fostered a humanitarian-centric vision of change and a de-politicised humanity, foregrounding the physical needs of human beings, and casting social, economic, emotional and spiritual needs as matters outside the humanitarian realm. The humanitarian enterprise is still widely seen as a patronising undertaking, mirroring deep

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Melanie Williams

straightforward statement of social protest on the part of its makers, which is partly due to the casting of Diana Dors, a notorious and flamboyant British film personality of the 1950s, in the role of Mary Hilton. Hailed as the only sex symbol Britain has produced since Lady Godiva, Diana Dors was a precocious teenager who had made her first film appearance at the age of 15 as a spiv’s mistress in The Shop at

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Kerry Kidd

which leaves them with nowhere else to go. On the other hand, in both form and theme the film is consciously melodramatic, casting Helen Allistair as the villain of the piece whose abuse and exploitation are eventually appropriately punished. As a consequence the film clearly and honestly depicts contemporary abuses, but seems unsure whether to blame respectable social prejudice, more simplistic

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
The early British films of Joseph Losey
Neil Sinyard

, either on script, casting, cutting, music or on anything else. The result, whether the film succeeds or not, whether one likes the film or not, at least it’s something I can defend as being mine. It is all of one piece.’ As a film-struck teenager, I saw The Servant when it was first released and can recall being utterly bowled over by it. At that time, infected by a fashionable disdain towards British

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Quentin Crisp as Orlando’s Elizabeth I
Glyn Davis

with people with HIV/AIDS, the Queen Mum for her alleged reputation as a fan of a party and a tipple. For Sally Potter, however, Crisp’s persona squared neatly with the role of Elizabeth I. In an interview with Penny Florence, she discussed her casting decisions: [W] ith Quentin, there are so many ways in which he’s right for the part

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
‘Numbers games’ and ‘holocausts’ at Jasenovac and Bleiburg
David Bruce MacDonald

either ‘Serbophobia’ or ‘Greater Serbia’. This chapter reviews two of the most important persecution myths emerging from the Second World War. Revising the history of the Ustaša-run death-camp at Jasenovac was a useful means of casting Serbs as the victims of a ‘Holocaust’ by Croats. On the Croatian side, the massacre at Bleiburg (Austria) by Communist forces (or Serb-led Communists, as the case might be) in 1945 was also likened to the Holocaust. In both cases, the other side was accused of committing genocide, using either the mask of Nazi or Communist domination to

in Balkan holocausts?
Reinventing medieval leprosy for the modern world, 1850–1950
Kathleen Vongsathorn and Magnus Vollset

and contemporary, to aggrandise the medieval religious and philanthropic tradition of healing the leprosy sufferer. Philanthropic perspectives on medieval leprosy Leprosy has long been a disease of contradictions, and while modern Europeans were casting medieval Europeans in a negative light to suit their own medical, social and political agendas, they were also looking to their medieval ancestors for positive inspiration to philanthropy. Many of the same authors who wrote about the isolation, stigmatisation and cruel treatment of leprosy sufferers in medieval

in Leprosy and identity in the Middle Ages
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author: Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.