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History, legend and memory in John Sayles’ Lone Star
Neil Campbell

representation of US history came to the fore, often embedded in the looser exchanges and controversies over so-called political correctness. George Lipsitz cites Lynne Cheney, E. D. Hirsch, Allan Bloom and others, who began to attack new forms of history teaching for betraying particular established knowledges about America and its past. As Cheney wrote in 1988, history textbooks needed to be like those of the

in Memory and popular film
Letter to M. Cavell about cinema (a remake)
Joshua Foa Dienstag

. d’Alembert on the Theatre ). It provoked an extended public exchange and represented Rousseau’s permanent break from d’Alembert, Diderot and all his former Enlightenment allies. In our day, the optimistic view that a nation’s political culture may be improved by the exposure of its people to spectacles of a particular kind has again become popular. It has

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism
Open Access (free)
Joshua Foa Dienstag

others nor his paranoia about their motives. On the contrary, I think our exchange will reveal that the spirit of friendship can survive disagreement and, in fact, even be strengthened by it. But again I remind you that we can only disagree and be nourished by our dissensus after the film has ended and not while it still plays. I remain undaunted in the thought that this

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism
Consumerism and alienation in 1950s comedies
Dave Rolinson

the collective action of the police, but this is possible because of the intervention of anti-consumerist consensus. The robbers are first obstructed by a stall keeper who mistakenly thinks that Pendlebury has stolen a painting. The arrival of the police warns of the dangers inherent in the gang’s inability to grasp that consumerism is dependent upon exchange value – all they can exchange for the

in British cinema of the 1950s
A reply from Saturday Night to Mr. Dienstag
Tracy B. Strong

acquiescence to George and his conventional standards into a critique of George and a reminder to Tracy that she is, one might say, facing the wrong way, that she is not behaving according to her nature (a nature about which she has needed to be educated, and not one to which she can be recalled). Or, again during the exchange with George about Tracy’s behavior the previous night with

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism
Open Access (free)
Yale’s Chronicles of America
Roberta E. Pearson

of School Administration and Head of the Department of Education at Yale; and Professor Nathaniel Wright Stephenson, formerly of the Department of History at the College of Charleston and later an exchange professor at Yale’. 7 The Council also formed a subsidiary company, the Chronicles of America Picture Corporation, headed by George Parmly Day, Treasurer of Yale and founder

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Robert Hamer after Ealing
Philip Kemp

trio – like that of Jules et Jim (1962) but in a darker register – self-destructs: Madeleine is led off to execution, Ledocq in effect commits suicide. The coda plays out in a nocturnal railway station where Maubert moodily watches troops embarking for Verdun and near-certain death. Among them he spots Ledocq who, exempt from conscription, has perversely volunteered. The two men exchange a wry

in British cinema of the 1950s
Robert Giddings

, 1998); and with Keith Selby, The Classic Serial on Television and Radio (Palgrave, 2001). I am a devout and practising Dickensian: my Student Guide to Charles Dickens was published in 2002 by Greenwich Exchange. Robert Giddings

in British cinema of the 1950s
Isabel Quigly

has lived in Sussex for many years. She has published a novel, The Eye of Heaven (Collins), called The Exchange of Joy in America (Harcourt Brace), and several books of criticism and social history; including The Heirs of Tom Brown: The English School Story (Chatto & Windus; in paperback, OUP). She edited the Penguin Shelley, still in print after 45 years, introduced and

in British cinema of the 1950s
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Civil rites of passage
Sharon Monteith

-frame is of her face in close-up as she holds her place in the line of passive resistance the black women have formed against the white men who seek to destroy the carpool and humiliate the women who use it. The camera moves laterally as she and Miriam exchange tearful, apprehensive smiles but it is on Odessa’s face – a picture of dignity – that it rests. Her face is the closing image of the film. Odessa

in Memory and popular film