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Speaking of Ireland
Colin Graham

discussion of the strategies of writing about Ireland in relation to the critical ‘self’ which becomes implicated in that ‘Ireland’. I examine the role which the ‘warmer memory’ of ‘the people’ crucially undertakes in the processes of a criticism which takes to itself or asserts identity politics, and discuss the ‘organic’ necessities of Norquay_03_Ch2 32 22/3/02, 9:46 am 33 Speaking of Ireland the intellectual as they are reacted against and reconstructed in Joyce’s Stephen Dedalus. Barthes’ Michelet, my argument goes, exemplifies the fact that ‘crossing marginality

in Across the margins
Anu Koivunen
,
Katariina Kyrölä
, and
Ingrid Ryberg

, this approach simultaneously resists equating the power of vulnerability with identity politics or reducing it to a ‘politics of pain’. The pull of the neoliberal, individualistic narrative of ‘from vulnerability to resilience’ is forceful both in feminist academic discussions and contemporary public discussions and media cultures. However, in this book we want to follow up on Butler’s call for understanding vulnerability as restraint as well as responsiveness, a concept rife with paradoxes, but also potential. Furthermore, we want to stress vulnerability

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Don’t Ever Wipe Tears Without Gloves as a reparative fantasy
Anu Koivunen

), Helgeson (2012), Liljestrand (2012), Svensson (2012), and Wilson (2012). For editorial page commentary on the relevance of the series, see Franchell (2012), Ludvigsson (2012), and Kjöller (2012). For a cultural pages debate about identity politics see Edenheim (2012a; 2012b; 2013), Gardell (2012b), Hilton (2013a; 2013b), Nordenhök (2012), and Wiman (2012b), and a friendly exchange between Gardell and a critic (Gardell and Hilton, 2013). For tabloid publicity see Fårsjö (2012), Fjellborg (2012), Lindberg (2012), Lundberg (2012a), Schulman (2012), and Virtanen (2012). 2

in The power of vulnerability
Siobhán McIlvanney

’s writing, this chapter does not wish to play down the variety and hybridity of beur narratives in a quasi-colonialist drive for uniformity and categorisation. Indeed, the very recentness of the emergence of this writing makes any Beur female identity  endeavour to characterise its expression of identity politics tentative. Given the diversity of the writers who are conventionally grouped under the umbrella term beur – some writers classed as beur were born in North Africa then came to France, others were born in France of, say, a French mother and Algerian father

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Open Access (free)
Crossing the margins
Glenda Norquay
and
Gerry Smyth

obviously in the Runnymede Trust report. We also want, therefore, to examine the possible intersections between geopolitical markers of supposed ‘marginality’ and other boundaries and hierarchies operating in identity politics – gender, ethnicity, class and sexuality in particular. In this arena we believe that insufficient attention had been placed to the relationship between ‘Celtic spaces’ and other areas of ‘difference’, even within the context of emerging concerns around a ‘New Britishness’: As Robert Crawford notes in the afterword to his influential Devolving

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Gill Rye
and
Michael Worton

/or feminine) writing subjects in the s as they continue to operate in the tension between the postmodern deconstruc- Introduction  tion of the subject and a feminist, queer or post-colonial interest in identity politics? On both counts – the postmodern fragmentation of the subject and the demise of authorial power – female/feminine subjects were threatened even as they at last began to come to the fore in French culture. Kristeva’s term, le sujet en procès (subject in process and on trial), is rarely used to describe the late twentieth-century subject of women

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
The failure and success of a Swedish film diversity initiative
Mara Lee Gerdén

Hence, the ‘Beyond the new black’ seminar reframed questions of diversity and representation in an empowering context, and it was also the occasion when the Fusion Programme was presented. The gender equality goal of the Swedish Film Institute had previously been met by suspicion and critique,10 but the loudest criticism coincided with the launch of the Fusion Programme in late 2015 (see ­figure  9.1). In an article in Dagens Nyheter, several persons questioned what they termed ‘identity politics’ pursued by Anna Serner, the present CEO of the Swedish Film Institute

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Nicola McDonald

, they are also stories in which desire functions as what Peter Brooks calls the ‘motor force’ of narrative.40 At the start of virtually every romance a desire is present, usually in a state of initial arousal, that is so intense (because thwarted or challenged) that action – some kind of forward narrative movement designed to bring about change – is demanded. Sexual desire (whether wanted, unwanted or feared) is one of the most common initiatory devices, but a desire for offspring, material wealth, a lost identity, political or religious dominion, or simply aventure

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Katariina Kyrölä

: Princeton University Press. Brunila, K. and L.-​M. Rossi (2017). ‘Identity politics, the ethos of vulnerability, and education’, Educational Philosophy and Theory, 50:3, pp. 287–​98. https://​doi.org/​ 10.1080/​00131857.2017.1343115. Butler, J. (2004). Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence. London: Verso. Carter, A. (2015). ‘Teaching with trauma: Trigger warnings, feminism, and disability pedagogy’, Disability Studies Quarterly, 35:2, http://​dsq-​sds.org/​article/​view/​ 4652/​3935 (accessed 17 December 2017). Cecire, N. (2014). ‘On the “neoliberal

in The power of vulnerability
The ambivalence of queer visibility in audio- visual archives
Dagmar Brunow

is the result of a three-​year grant (RJ 2013–​2016). From 2017, it has been administered by the National Library of Sweden (see also Snickars, 2015). 18 However, in times of right-​wing populism the vulnerability of national archives dedicated to liberal identity politics is likely to increase. 19 www.cinema.ucla.edu/​collections/​outfest-​ucla-​legacy- ​project-​lgbt-​moving-​ image-​preservation (accessed 20 February 2017). 20 Meanwhile, the Swedish Archive for Queer Moving Images and Filmarkivet.se have initiated a collaboration in 2018. REFERENCES Axelsson

in The power of vulnerability