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Iain Lindsey, Tess Kay, Ruth Jeanes, and Davies Banda

5 Approaches to local SfD provision This chapter provides an in-depth analysis of how SfD is delivered in Zambian communities, paying particular attention to those who are central to this provision; namely, Zambian peer leaders. In doing so, the chapter addresses a number of topics that have frequently featured elsewhere in the SfD literature, in studies that have largely focused on specific programmes. This chapter offers a contrasting and

in Localizing global sport for development
Norbert Steinhaus

17 Pollution levels in local lakes in Denmark Norbert Steinhaus Context The Danish Society for the Conservation of Nature (DN) of Frederikssund is a local committee of a national NGO working towards protecting nature and the environment. DN Frederikssund addresses local issues regarding the protection of nature and the environment to achieve local sustainable development. It initiates local campaigns, participates in political hearings and comments on the municipality’s environmental strategies and plans. In the mid-1990s, DN Frederikssund became aware of

in Knowledge, democracy and action
The case of air quality monitoring in a Spanish industrial area
Miguel A. López-Navarro

8 Legitimating confrontational discourses by local environmental groups: The case of air quality monitoring in a Spanish industrial area Miguel A. López-Navarro Introduction The escalating role of the firm at the expense of the public authorities’ function as guarantors of citizens’ rights may have helped drive the increased political authority of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs)1 as representatives of civil society (Hahn and Pinkse 2014). In the business and society literature, there is a growing body of research on firm–NGO relationships (Dahan et al. 2010

in Toxic truths
Constructing population in the search for disease genes
Steve Sturdy

geneticists thought about human genetic diversity and, ultimately, about human populations. Capturing human genetic variation Initially the work of identifying and cataloguing SNPs proceeded in a relatively uncoordinated fashion, with the establishment of local databases in a number of leading North American and European research centres. However, this work progressed against a backdrop of concern that researchers’ access to large bodies of accumulated genomic data was threatened by moves to bring those data into private ownership. In

in Global health and the new world order
Joy Molina Mirasol, Felix S. Mirasol, Estela C. Itaas Jr., and Benjamin Maputi

12 Enhancing local policymakers’ capacity in environmental governance in the Philippines Joy Molina Mirasol, Felix S. Mirasol, Jr., Estela C. Itaas and Benjamin Maputi Context The forest land in the province of Bukidnon, Philippines, is continuously declining in terms of its economic and environmental capacity. Forest destruction by timber poachers and conversion of forest land for agriculture are rising to an alarming level, leaving the remaining forest cover significantly below the desired 45 percent cover to sustain its services. Such decline and

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Paul Collinson

3 Environmental attitudes, community development, and local politics in Ireland Paul Collinson Anyone who has ever visited Ireland will be immediately struck by the natural beauty of the country. From the rugged uplands of the west, the golden beaches of Cork and Kerry, the rolling drumlins of the midlands to the sea cliffs of the north, Ireland is undoubtedly blessed with one of the richest and most diverse environmental endowments in Europe. Attracted by tourist brochures and advertisements which play heavily on images of Ireland as a rural paradise, tourists

in Alternative countrysides
The Politics of ‘Proximity’ and Performing Humanitarianism in Eastern DRC
Myfanwy James

Introduction One morning in Goma, I attended a meeting of the Cercle de la Sécurité : a group of Congolese humanitarians who work in security management for different international NGOs (non-governmental organisations) in the province. Although they hold a variety of different job titles, the members perform a common function within their respective organisations: they analyse local security conditions by collecting information about protracted violence and acts of criminality. They form and maintain a network among different local authorities and armed

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Timothy Longman

the Holocaust. In March 1995, a research team organised by Alison Des Forges of HRW and Eric Gillet of FIDH established an office in Rwanda and began to gather evidence, focusing both on the organisation of the genocide at the national level and on its execution at the local level, with an exploration of three local case studies. The research project that ultimately involved a dozen researchers culminated in the publication in 1999 of the 789-page report, Leave None to Tell the Story: Genocide in Rwanda , written primarily by Des Forges (1999) . Leave None to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Zahira Araguete-Toribio

This article considers how the reburial and commemoration of the human remains of the Republican defeated during the Spanish Civil War (1936–39) is affected by the social, scientific and political context in which the exhumations occur. Focusing on a particular case in the southwestern region of Extremadura, it considers how civil society groups administer reburial acts when a positive identification through DNA typing cannot be attained. In so doing, the article examines how disparate desires and memories come together in collective reburial of partially individuated human remains.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)
Local Understandings of Resilience after Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban City, Philippines
Ara Joy Pacoma, Yvonne Su, and Angelie Genotiva

-disaster resilience ( Eadie, 2019 ). But the heavy use of the concept of resilience in the context of disasters has triggered concerns for how to define and operationalise it. One of the biggest discrepancies is that while only local people know their own needs and only they can define their own priorities, disaster resilience frameworks and programmes often lack local voices for practical implementation ( Atienza et al ., 2016 ; Murphy et al. , 2018 ; Moatty et al. , 2017 ). And when local input from disaster-affected households is included, their understanding of resilience

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs