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Open Access (free)
Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author:

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

Open Access (free)
Gill Rye
and
Michael Worton

out close readings of the aesthetics, the form and the workings of the text. A remarkable feature is that these very close readings lead the various critics to draw on a range of different theoretical and interpretative frameworks from within literary criticism and, importantly, beyond – from psychoanalysis to linguistics, through trauma and post-colonial studies and performance art. The critical discourse generated by these interdisciplinary forays produces fruitful and thought-provoking analyses of contemporary writing and confirms its relevance to contemporary

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Waterford’s Magdalen Laundry
Jennifer O’Mahoney
,
Kate McCarthy
, and
Jonathan Culleton

society. 17 Live art emphasises the body in space. The centrality of the body, alongside the elements of time, site, and the relationship between audience and performer, characterise the pillars of performance art, or live art, practice. 18 In acknowledging the relationship between the audience and the performers’ bodies in a space, the audience are framed as participants and ‘co-creators’ of the work. 19

in Legacies of the Magdalen Laundries
Open Access (free)
What can curiosity-driven public engagement activities contribute to dialogues about animal research?
Emma Roe
,
Sara Peres
, and
Bentley Crudgington

, before discussing how we have been inspired by other performance art, and how MX facilitators generate talk during the activity. We then move to discuss particular aspects of the infrastructure around an MX Workshop – the biobank, the passport, the ear-punch, the Infinity Box, and the caging system – and what these can add to the activity. We conclude by reflecting on how the MX helps move beyond deficit-model approaches to public engagement around animal research, instead offering a valuable creative, curiosity

in Researching animal research
Open Access (free)
,

performance art and Latin American political life. In the blurring of the line between performance and performativity, as outlined above, Taylor states that in this socio-political context, we need to understand practices such as civic disobedience, resistance, citizenship, gender, ethnicity and sexual identity, as performance , observing how they are ‘rehearsed and carried out daily in the public sphere’ (Taylor 2015 : 35). To understand them as performance is to see and recognise how performance also acts as an

in Performing the jumbled city
Emma Roe
,
Bella Lear
, and
Louise Mackenzie

the purpose and value of consumer labelling, who benefits from it, and the role such labels play in decision-making. In ‘Building participation through fictional worlds’ ( Chapter 16 ), performance art was used to allow groups of public audiences to experience the deliberations and decisions made by an Animal Welfare Ethical Review Body (AWERB) in a way that completely changed their access to, and experience of, the discussions. Researchers were able to create a new type of ethical review, embedded in a

in Researching animal research
More-than-human microbial methods on the bus
Charlotte Veal
,
Paul Hurley
,
Emma Roe
, and
Sandra Wilks

research. Routes to Safety amalgamated knowledges and practices from microbiology, geography, landscape architecture and performance art, and methods spanning scientific, social and creative techniques – including swabbing, interviews, ethnography and filmmaking. None of these methods were innovative in and of themselves but what was valuable in the context of the pandemic was the mutually informative process

in Knowing COVID- 19
Sarah Pogoda
and
Lindsey Colbourne

and being watched is open to technologically mediated forms of bodies and gazes (Brook, 1996 ), Peggy Phelan insisted on performance art as a physical live experience that would change its ontological status if it is ‘saved, recorded, documented, or otherwise participate[s]‌ in the circulation of representations of representations’ (Phelan, 2005 : 146). Different to his predecessors

in Adaptation and resilience in the performing arts
Consumerism and alienation in 1950s comedies
Dave Rolinson

Film Culture (Flicks Books, 1997), p. 11. 4 Stuart Laing, Representations of Working-Class Life: 1957–1964 (Macmillan, 1986), p. 113. 5 John Ellis, ‘Cinema as performance art’, in Justine Ashby and Andrew Higson (eds), British

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Jen Archer-Martin
and
Julieanna Preston

-in-the-world. Entering the space of maintenance work, Ukeles employs performance art to draw undervalued labour into a space of critical aesthetic consideration. In Touch Sanitation Performance , Ukeles shook hands with 8,500 New York City sanitation workers over eleven months. Through this act, the artist-at-work met the maintenance-worker-at-work face-to-face. The importance of touch cannot be understated here: perhaps the most powerful gesture of care in Ukeles’ work is the recognition of mutual humanity, through skin-to-skin contact, with the performer of a labour perceived as

in Performing care