Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • "second Anglo-Boer War" x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All
Heloise Brown

‘ the truest form of patriotism ’ 10 Feminist responses to the second Anglo-Boer war, 1899–19021 T he various pacifist feminist discourses discussed in this book co-existed and to some extent competed with one another, a phenomenon seen particularly clearly during the final years of the study. An examination of the responses to the second Anglo-Boer war of 1899–1902 illustrates how nationalist and imperialist campaigns could challenge feminist arguments regarding women’s unique role in the nation. The Anglo-Boer war concludes the period under discussion in

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Charlotte Dale

3 The social exploits and behaviour of nurses during the Anglo-Boer War, 1899–19021 Charlotte Dale During the Second Anglo-Boer War, two key watchwords associated with serving nurses were ‘duty’ and ‘respectability’.2 At the commencement of war, women from across the Empire, including trained nurses, saw the opportunity to travel to South Africa to experience war and work alongside men as their equals, caught up in a patriotic fervour to defend and expand the Queen’s lands. The war, which resulted from years of ambitious encounters over gold deposits, Afrikaner

in Colonial caring
Pacifist feminism in Britain, 1870–1902
Author: Heloise Brown

This book explores the pervasive influence of pacifism on Victorian feminism. It provides an account of Victorian women who campaigned for peace, and of the many feminists who incorporated pacifist ideas into their writing on women and gender. The book explores feminists' ideas about the role of women within the empire, their eligibility for citizenship, and their ability to act as moral guardians in public life. It shows that such ideas made use – in varying ways – of gendered understandings of the role of force and the relevance of arbitration and other pacifist strategies. The book examines the work of a wide range of individuals and organisations, from well-known feminists such as Lydia Becker, Josephine Butler and Millicent Garrett Fawcett to lesser-known figures such as the Quaker pacifists Ellen Robinson and Priscilla Peckover.

Heloise Brown

pacifism’.7 While Peckover allied herself with the Peace Society more closely than most other female peace activists of this period, it is important to stress that on a number of significant issues she disagreed with its aims and methods. She was also critical of the expansionist British imperialism that was being practiced across the globe, and she publicly disagreed with the Peace Society on the question of how to protest against the second Anglo-Boer war. Although Peckover’s personal focus was strongly influenced by Christianity, she supported all other associations

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Christine E. Hallett

war experiences. British nurse writer Kate Luard, a veteran of the Second Anglo-Boer War (1899–1902) began the First World War as a sister with the QAIMNS Reserve and rose to the position of Head Sister to one of the most significant British advanced casualty clearing stations. American Alice Fitzgerald, a prominent member of the nursing profession in the USA, joined the QAIMNS Reserve as a sister in 1916, but left to take up a senior role with the American Red Cross following the USA’s entry into the war. The quintessential British nurse: Kate Luard Katherine

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Feminist journals and peace questions
Heloise Brown

was also notably absent from the approach of her successors. With Biggs as editor, the Review contained frequent articles on abstract questions of peace and war, as well as regular reports of women’s peace activities. Under the guidance of Blackburn and Mackenzie, a more jingoistic approach was adopted, in which lip service was paid to the importance of questions of international peace and the prevention of war, but outspoken support was given to imperialist expansion, notably in the case of the second Anglo-Boer war. The Review reported The Hague Peace Conference

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Open Access (free)
Pacifism and feminism in Victorian Britain
Heloise Brown

ambivalent relationship to the peace ideas outlined above. While socialists such as Ford were active in the campaign against the second Anglo-Boer war, and Pankhurst and her husband were involved in some of the arbitration associations discussed in this book, there was limited engagement by socialist feminists in pacifism before the Edwardian period.20 In contrast to both socialist and pacifist feminist arguments, there were also feminists who resisted the ideological connections between ‘women’ and ‘peace’, and rejected anti-expansionist models of imperialism. Millicent

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Christine E. Hallett

new phenomenon:  the Second Anglo-Boer War (1899–1902) and the Russo-Japanese War (1904–5) had featured the use of machine guns and the deployment of heavy artillery. What was new, and (for most) unexpected, was the extent of the carnage. The unsuccessful assaults that characterised the first three-and-a-half years of the First World War led to massive numbers of casualties, sometimes numbering tens of thousands in one day. Typically, the wounded would arrive at field hospitals as ‘rushes’  – more than could be coped with by even the best-staffed hospital with the

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Jane Brooks

training since the developments of schools of nursing in the nineteenth century. Furthermore, nurses saw this work as involving skilled decision making, rather than being a simple domestic task.78 In the absence of drug therapies, it was often the only method of supporting recovery.79 As Charlotte Dale argues, during the Second Anglo-­Boer War (1899–1902) the provision of ‘food, fluids and palliatives’80 was the only treatment regimen for typhoid.81 Although by the Second World War, TAB (typhoid-­paratyphoid A and B) vaccination against typhoid was given to all those on

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
Contextualising colonial and post-colonial nursing
Helen Sweet and Sue Hawkins

disease outbreak, as a prism through which to examine historical questions, invisible or overlooked processes can be revealed. Dale also uses a crisis, in her case the Second Anglo-Boer War (1899–1902), to question the motivation, control and organisation of military nursing at the end of the nineteenth century. Her study reveals a crisis within military nursing, performed at the time by a mix of trained and lay nurses, as the army struggled to meet the demand for professional nursing in the first major conflict to involve nurses in large numbers since the Crimea. The

in Colonial caring