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Ford Madox Ford, the novel and the Great War
Author: Sara Haslam

This book is about Ford Madox Ford, a hero of the modernist literary revolution. Ford is a fascinating and fundamental figure of the time; not only because, as a friend and critic of Ezra Pound and Joseph Conrad, editor of the English Review and author of The Good Soldier, he shaped the development of literary modernism. But, as the grandson of Ford Madox Brown and son of a German music critic, he also manifested formative links with mainland European culture and the visual arts. In Ford there is the chance to explore continuity in artistic life at the turn of the last century, as well as the more commonly identified pattern of crisis in the time. The argument throughout the book is that modernism possesses more than one face. Setting Ford in his cultural and historical context, the opening chapter debates the concept of fragmentation in modernism; later chapters discuss the notion of the personal narrative, and war writing. Ford's literary technique is studied comparatively and plot summaries of his major books (The Good Soldier and Parade's End) are provided, as is a brief biography.

Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

passage of the modern movement to that of Attila, sweeping across Europe.23 It had left many of its key figures grasping at fragments. Writing in 1918, Ford tried to reassemble the ‘fragments’ that were coming into his mind, ‘as in a cubist picture’, in narrative.24 His most famous narrator struggles to give an 4 Fragmenting modernism ‘all-round impression’ as he tortuously and retrospectively constructs multiple examples of the ‘minutest fragment’ of the truth.25 Woolf, too, in Orlando, tries to work with the ‘thousand odd, disconnected fragments’ thrown up by

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

of shell-shock cases’ (The Edwardian Turn of Mind, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1968, p. 114). 29 See Christopher Butler’s discussion of, and regular reference to, Freud in his study of early modernism: Early Modernism: Literature, Music and Painting in Europe 1900–1916 (Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1994). Elizabeth Abel quotes Bronislaw Malinowski on this subject: ‘psychoanalysis has had within the last ten years [1917–27] a truly meteoric rise in popular favour. It has exercised a growing influence over contemporary literature, science and art’ (Virginia

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

in a review of Lewis’s Dodsworth in the Bookman in 1929: The fact is, if you go to look at a landscape, or to observe a country you 42 Fragmenting modernism won’t much do so, your impressions being too self-conscious; whereas, if you live and are your normal self and, above all, suffer in any given environment, that environment will eat itself into your mind and come back to you in moments of emotion and you will be part of that environment and you will know it. It is because Mr. Dodsworth suffers and endures in odd places all over the European and semi-European

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

Perhaps because, as Peter Conrad suggests, to Hemingway ‘the language which offered to give an account of [the war] had given up, or died of shame’ (Modern Times, Modern Places: Life and Art in the Twentieth Century, London, Thames & Hudson, 1998, p. 213). 112 Fragmenting modernism 6 In Paroles d’un combattant (1920), quoted by Jay Winter in Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2000), p. 184. 7 Peter Childs provides a pertinent reminder, however, that for modernists in general language

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Antipodean life as a comparative exercise
Sarah Comyn

accounts will also demonstrate how these depictions mobilised the trope of antipodal inversion to portray a growing economic and colonial independence that provided a means of addressing the north and destabilising Eurocentric hierarchies. 6 Imagined cartographies and geographies of the Antipodes The imaginative pull of a ‘south’ in opposition to a European ‘north’ is not unique to the nineteenth century. William Eisler traces the ‘invention of the concept of a southern continent’ to Pythagoras; and numerous medieval maps abound with images of this continent that

in Worlding the south
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

). Ultimately, as the conclusion to these two chapters, the fragmentation endemic to modernism (represented in these cases by the war, by technology and by the contemporary perception of the ‘woman problem’), involves multiple perspectives that can destroy one’s sense of one’s world and one’s sense of oneself. But this isn’t always the case. Regeneration, of the kind that eventually comes to Tietjens, as the end point of his journey through war, is also in its gift. This chapter traces the roots of this (often atavistic2) regenerative possibility in Ford, a possibility that

in Fragmenting modernism
Sara Haslam

, divided sensibilities’, but as a version of the more general, and positive, rediscovery of ‘chains and networks of desires and fears’ that modernism can also provide.1 In Ancient Lights, Ford’s greatest energy, his greatest visionary power, was related to his own unconscious psychological processes. The results of these processes, the stuff on the page, often constructed in scenes (like that of the doves) to be viewed by the imaginative reader, bespoke what had been forgotten, or repressed. Taken together, all these texts were seen to provide many such examples that

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Southern worlds, globes, and spheres
Sarah Comyn and Porscha Fermanis

Linked by the histories, geographies, and legacies of ‘imperial desire’, the countries and peoples of the southern hemisphere have long been shaped by their approximate otherness. 1 Defined and redefined by shifting European cartographic visions of unknown and unknowable lands inspiring exploration, discovery, conquest, and colonisation from at least the sixteenth century onwards, the qualities of distance and difference ascribed to those southern topographies by a northern gaze have more recently been remapped on to the south as an ‘indexical category’ and

in Worlding the south
Open Access (free)
Murdo Macdonald

to twentieth-century immigration from Europe and the British Empire, Scotland has historically and presently an overtly diverse cultural identity. Regardless of what language or languages are spoken at present, most Scots are aware of the linguistic diversity of their own backgrounds. A workingclass woman from a post-industrial Ayrshire steel town whose first language is Scots may share with a middle-class man born in Edinburgh whose first language is English the fact that each has a great-grandparent who was a native Gaelic speaker. This shows the degree of threat

in Across the margins