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Personal Shakespeare

friends, lovers, enemies. I have cited only a handful: Christopher Marlowe and Thomas Nashe, Emilia Bassano Lanier, Gabriel Harvey, William Brooke, the Careys, and Hamnet Shakespeare. But the personal associations in Shakespeare’s plays remain a dimension less than well understood. Perhaps that was why the playwright remained inscrutable to Thomas Carlyle, and why Sidney Lee found his art

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

not this as being his parasite who lou’d him least will doe him greater right Noe well deserving muse but will impart her flowers to crown his Industrie & art when any wrongd him lyuing they did feele his spirite quicke as powder sharp as stele But to his freindes her faculties were faire pleasant and milde as the most temp

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

were married and that the poet expressed feelings of guilt in Sonnet 152: ‘In loving thee thou know’st I am forsworn, But thou art twice forsworn, to me love swearing, In act thy bed-vow broke and new faith torn, In vowing new hate after new love bearing.’ ‘The poet’s confession ... must refer to his marriage vows.’ 35 Can we not see how the poet’s sense of being both betrayer

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

Friend. What art thou? Hub.     Of the part of England. Bast.     Whither doest thou go? Hub.     What’s that to thee? Hub.     [Bas.] Why may not I demand of thine affaires, As well as thou of

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

stage’ and the so the great speech begins. As it ends, Orlando enters bearing Adam – a mere eight lines suffice to set him to meat – after which Amiens’ song follows: Blow, blow, thou winter winde, Thou art not so vnkinde, as mans ingratitude Thy tooth is not so keene, because thou art

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

in the same vocation wherein he was called’ (1 Corinthians 7:20). To those bridling at their low station he wrote, ‘Art thou called [galled at] being a seruant? care not for it’ (7:21). The marginal gloss in the Geneva Bible reads: ‘Althogh God hathe called thee to serue in this life, yet thinke not thy condition vnworthie for a Christian ... For he that is called in the Lord

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

Nashe to get his joke. Because the Queen had said that Harvey ‘lookt like an Italian’ Shakespeare gave his character an Italian name. One final note: recovering the link between M.O.A.I. and Harvey’s kiss of Elizabeth’s hand throws a fresh and delicious light on the final sentence in Maria’s letter (2.5.150–3): ‘ Go to, thou art made if

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

this innovation: ‘This production of Kemble’s [1815] was the first [on record] to reverse the order of the first two scenes, a regrettable change often made since, and occasionally found even today.’ The editors cite three reasons why the scenes might have been rudely disordered: ‘One is the desire to improve on Shakespeare’s dramatic art. A second is the need to get

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

matter, to be reformed by November.’ William Cecil, 1st Baron Burleigh, ‘Memorial Concerning Dr. John Dee’s Opinion on the Reformation of the Calendar’, British Library, London, MS Lansd. No. 39, Art 14, Orig. 24 Edmund Grindal, Archbishop of Canterbury, Letter to Queen Elizabeth, 6 March 1583, British

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

chapter explores what is meant by early modern English visual culture, and expounds my approach to drama as a part of that visual culture. The phrase ‘visual culture’ emerged in art-historical criticism in the late twentieth century, and is usually used with reference to modern and postmodern visuality, although it is notable that the first allusion to ‘visual culture’ is in

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama