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The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction

, it points to the contested nature of the country's history. Although the Irish families to whom Louisa refers deploy the term ‘Milesian’ as a mark of pride in their lineage, the reminder of their august heritage is also a reminder that, as Kilfeather put it, ‘England is only the latest in a series of colonial powers to invade Ireland, and that the country has no native identity’. 45 The notion of colonial invasion is supported in the text by the character of Colonel Walter, an early version of the absentee landlord, who has

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott

. 38 See Price, ‘Ancient liberties?’, and Watt, Contesting the gothic . 39 Price, ‘Ancient liberties?’, p. 23. 40 Toni Wein, British identities, heroic nationalisms, and the gothic novel, 1764–1824 (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction

4 Gothic materialities: Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction Evocative of the nationally transformative potential of travel sketched in The old Irish baronet (1808) and The tradition of the castle (1824), Regina Maria Roche's The castle chapel (1825) establishes the global journey of one of its two protagonists as the key to restored and refreshed identities at home. Compelled by his dependent status to conciliate the favour of a rich uncle by travelling first to India and then

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Location the Irish gothic novel

-fictional ‘martyrology’ and enduring identity-in-opposition that would both define the Irish Anglican community and underwrite Irish gothic literary production in the long eighteenth century. 10 Alongside annual, commemorative sermons preached on the anniversary of the outbreak of rebellion on 23 October 1641, repeated reprintings of Sir John Temple's The Irish rebellion (1646) over the next 150 years registered enduring Protestant paranoia over a recurrence of 1641-scale violence. 11 New editions of The Irish rebellion appeared ‘in response to Protestant insecurities at

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Thefts, violence and sexual threats

demonise and idealise the past. 15 This notion is examined by Diana Wallace in her analysis of Gothic and legal institutions that traces this association to Margaret Cavendish’s 1662 ‘Female Orations’. 16 Wallace, while focusing on ‘the haunting idea’ as Gothic and legal metaphor, makes important connections between legal institutions and the Female Gothic fixation on loss of female identity

in Gothic incest
Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest

. J. Clery refers to the Gothic combination of sexual, familial and economic restrictions that creates a constrained environment and forces the heroine to recognise ‘the inescapable bonds of kinship’. 13 The hidden identities of characters and these ‘inescapable bonds of kinship’ that are linked to sexuality are revealed by endowing kin with either strikingly similar or opposite traits. Relatives are

in Gothic incest
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Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction

taken to prison, where she witnesses the people who attempt to assist her falling victim, one after another, to revolutionary zeal. At length, she returns to Ireland, disfigured from a near-fatal bout of smallpox, only to be denied by her mother, who is anxious that Sophia retain the inheritance meant for Augusta. When she finally proves her identity and assumes her rightful inheritance, Augusta finds further obstacles presented by her Catholicism. Although she has been careful, on her father's advice, never publicly to reveal her conversion from

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange

identity are taken to extremes, as is the utter implausibility of the circumstances that bring the characters together at the castle. The manner in which the loose ends are tied together by disclosures from the key characters is comedic in its improbability. Furthermore, the initial murder/destruction of Conrad, the son of the household, is never explained, by means wholly supernatural or other. Walpole describes

in Gothic incest
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Cousins and the changing status of family

immorality is contested by scholars in the field. Perry suggests such unions are presented as culturally accepted, stating that ‘eighteenth-century fiction corroborates the cultural standing of these legal regulations. There is not the slightest indication of the least impropriety in first-cousin marriage in eighteenth-century novels.’ 22 Pollak, however, argues in relation to Jane Austen’s Mansfield

in Gothic incest