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Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

example, has discussed the tensions between official histories and their contestation in ‘popular’ or unofficial memory, analysing the bearing of historical and memorial knowledge on formations of identity and operations of power. In a discussion of ‘film and popular memory’ in French cinema of the 1970s (specifically, a number of films dealing with the French Resistance), Foucault suggests that memory is ‘a very important

in Memory and popular film
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History, legend and memory in John Sayles’ Lone Star
Neil Campbell

through the community’s ‘stratigraphic landscape’, that ‘conceives historical understanding as an after-life of that which is understood, whose pulse can still be felt in the present’. 4 Through these acts of retrieval, Sayles’ film can be seen as in dialogue with the ‘culture wars’ debates of the 1980s–90s in which issues of identity politics, multiculturalism and the

in Memory and popular film
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Yale’s Chronicles of America
Roberta E. Pearson

’ arrival, as well as of the first manifestations of the ‘living history’ movement, when in 1926 John D. Rockefeller, Jr. gave money for the Williamsburg restoration. At a time of contested national identity, then, the colonial period was enshrined as the originary moment of national identity as public institutions and social elites constructed an official culture and official memory to shore up the

in Memory and popular film
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Pleasantville and the textuality of media memory
Paul Grainge

allegory about the legacy and significance of the 1960s. I am interested in two related issues. At one level, I want to consider how the film operates in the contested field of meaning that, in the 1990s, came to debate the memory of America’s postwar past. This leads to a different, but overlapping, concern: namely, to what effect postmodern technologies and forms of representation impact upon the way

in Memory and popular film
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The ethics and politics of memory in an age of mass culture
Alison Landsberg

usually circumscribed by a particular community or group. In contrast to collective memories, which tend to be geographically specific and which serve to reinforce and naturalise a group’s identity, prosthetic memories are not the property of a single group. Rather, they open up the possibility for collective horizons of experience and pave the way for unexpected political alliances

in Memory and popular film
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Joshua Foa Dienstag

worst of these figures, but because he is the best of them and puts forth the most powerful and subtle case for his position, in addition to all the other ways in which his philosophy improves us. Still, I contest his position both on specific and general points. I contest, first, his interpretation of The Philadelphia Story , a film that he has said exemplifies the

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism
Continuity and change
Erin Bell and Ann Gray

historical national identity and in doing so create a sense of community within a culturally disparate nation. The rise of commemorative programming in nations across Europe over the past two decades has been noted by scholars: anniversaries offer programme makers and national broadcasters such as the BBC an opportunity to air material which conveys knowledge of significant national and international events

in The British monarchy on screen
Mandy Merck

The Special Relationship (directed by Richard Loncraine, 2009) on Blair’s dealings with US presidents Clinton and Bush. In many ways The Queen follows the formula of The Deal as closely as its two-syllable title. Both were directed by Stephen Frears and both focus on real-life political contests in which a frontrunner is defeated by a rival. Real-life Labour spin doctors (Peter Mandelson, played by

in The British monarchy on screen
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Amateur film, civic culture and the rehearsal of monarchy
Karen Lury

time, therefore, the film contains performances of loyalty to the locality and a performance of loyalty to the (British) Crown. In essence the film allows us to ask which queen is the real queen or to suppose (like Alice), that anyone can be a queen if they are in the right place at the right time. What the films reveal about the festival and thus about its central figure are the mixed motivations and contested histories that

in The British monarchy on screen
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Robert Hamer after Ealing
Philip Kemp

the other-worldly dread lingers. ‘You couldn’t perhaps be the Devil?’ asks de Gué ironically. ‘No – could you perhaps?’ responds Barrett, only half joking. He could, almost. Getting Barrett drunk, de Gué hijacks his clothes and his identity, leaving his own in unfair exchange. Hung over and dismayed, Barrett is driven off to de Gué’s chateau where his protests are brushed aside as another of Jacques

in British cinema of the 1950s