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In my search for tidy conclusions and a singular confirmation of the meaning of sport in the Black Atlantic, I came up empty handed, or “wit’ me two long arms” as cricket club members might say. There are so many dimensions to the transnational flows of peoples and cultures of the Afro-Caribbean diaspora that have important bearing on how we think about black masculinities

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
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-Caribbean community, to celebrate blackness and masculinity, and to establish themselves as part of a local community. I delve into their activities before, during and after games that mark them as part of a bounded group. Liming : creating Afro-Caribbean social spaces and networks For many of the Mavericks, playing cricket in Canada meant playing in cold weather for the first time

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Israeli security experience as an international brand

. As mentioned above, the ISE brand blends in with the national brand of Israel. I first describe this brand further. ISE symbolises not only security and safety for its clients, but also specific values as know-how, toughness, morality, and a distinct kind of masculinity, all linked to Israel as the supposed number one in the security industry. Simultaneously, this experience, which is often gained

in Security/ Mobility
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, constitutes an important way the Mavericks understand their own embodied black sporting masculinities. Important for this study is also the increasing migration of South Asians to Toronto including areas such as Peel Region, with more wealth and political power than black groups who have been there for decades. The more recent decline of the Windies and improvement of South Asian teams in international

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
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. As black masculinity formed in the Caribbean without clearly defined national communities, black male subjectivity has always been outward looking, linked to black men in other places. Michelle Stephens writes of the black diaspora that “[w]‌hile in contemporary discourse the terms nation and diaspora are often posed in opposition to each other, in certain forms of black discourse from the early

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
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James the connection between sport and politics “was seamless precisely because ideologies of masculinity, whether conscious or unconscious, were already shaping his understanding of the performative politics of cricket and his idea of how colonialism should be opposed” (Carby, 1998 , p. 120, emphasis in original). James’ fictional writing, including Minty Alley, examines working-class people and

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
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, a black man native to the island of Antigua, who migrated to Canada in 1975, played cricket when he arrived. For him, this was an expression of his race and masculinity, a source of friendship, fitness and, ultimately, bodily disrepair. Many Caribbean men’s stories about their migration experiences, settling in Toronto’s urban and suburban neighbourhoods, finding jobs, returning home for visits and

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
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their bleeding shins, foreheads, elbows and the resulting scars to attest to how serious and passionate they once were – and in some cases, still are – about the game. The dangerous situations they put themselves in, especially in the 1970s as ferocious fast bowling became a marker of Windies pride, also attest to their bravery, a marker of Afro-Caribbean masculinity. Roland, a 51-year-old black Guyanese

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
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Anne McClintock and H. Rider Haggard

themes. Likewise, discussion of reproduction can usefully be extended from Spivak’s formulations to include imperial masculinity and its mediation through reproductive ideology. This is precisely what Anne McClintock’s work promises to do. I want to focus here on her celebrated Imperial Leather discussion of H. Rider Haggard’s popular and influential imperialist Victorian romance King Solomon’s Mines.2 This depicts the quest for treasure in southern Africa by three British adventurers, who also restore the ‘rightful’ heir to the throne of an African kingdom. Several

in Postcolonial contraventions
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The autonomous life?

traditionally class-based affinities leads to the emergence of disturbing fascist identities founded on the construction of previously non-existent language-based ethnicities, wreaking havoc on a multi-lingual and multicultural urban landscape. A discourse interpolating fragile Hindu masculinities and a vilified Muslim “Other” bolsters the group’s membership and discursive authority in Bombay. The room and legitimacy for the articulation of popular resentment and discontent in all its facets, Hansen contextualizes, is

in The autonomous life?