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Antonia Lucia Dawes

through darkly humorous speech genres – that I refer to as banter and catcalls – that formed an important part of the performance of locally hegemonic masculinities in the everyday life of the street (Connell and Messerschmidt 2005 ; Harding 1975 ; Reiter 1975 : 58). Elsewhere in the book I have talked about humour as something that both challenged power – to defuse tension or imagine alternative solidarities – and functioned in complicity with power to abuse, silence and oppress subaltern groups of people (Bakhtin 1984 [1965]; Passerini 1987 : 67–126; Smitherman

in Race talk
Antonia Lucia Dawes

around belonging and entitlement to be transformed into a sort of social commentary that could be worked through relatively safely. Nevertheless, these humorous negotiations took place almost exclusively between men, whereas women in street markets, as I explored in Chapter 4 , were subjected to forms of violence that were more difficult to speak back against. This ritualised, ludic and competitive talk relied on an understanding of a local form of the masculinity of the guappo – a man of the people who was hardworking but also knew how to protect his own dignity

in Race talk
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

In my search for tidy conclusions and a singular confirmation of the meaning of sport in the Black Atlantic, I came up empty handed, or “wit’ me two long arms” as cricket club members might say. There are so many dimensions to the transnational flows of peoples and cultures of the Afro-Caribbean diaspora that have important bearing on how we think about black masculinities

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

-Caribbean community, to celebrate blackness and masculinity, and to establish themselves as part of a local community. I delve into their activities before, during and after games that mark them as part of a bounded group. Liming : creating Afro-Caribbean social spaces and networks For many of the Mavericks, playing cricket in Canada meant playing in cold weather for the first time

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Israeli security experience as an international brand
Erella Grassiani

. As mentioned above, the ISE brand blends in with the national brand of Israel. I first describe this brand further. ISE symbolises not only security and safety for its clients, but also specific values as know-how, toughness, morality, and a distinct kind of masculinity, all linked to Israel as the supposed number one in the security industry. Simultaneously, this experience, which is often gained

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

, constitutes an important way the Mavericks understand their own embodied black sporting masculinities. Important for this study is also the increasing migration of South Asians to Toronto including areas such as Peel Region, with more wealth and political power than black groups who have been there for decades. The more recent decline of the Windies and improvement of South Asian teams in international

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

. As black masculinity formed in the Caribbean without clearly defined national communities, black male subjectivity has always been outward looking, linked to black men in other places. Michelle Stephens writes of the black diaspora that “[w]‌hile in contemporary discourse the terms nation and diaspora are often posed in opposition to each other, in certain forms of black discourse from the early

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

James the connection between sport and politics “was seamless precisely because ideologies of masculinity, whether conscious or unconscious, were already shaping his understanding of the performative politics of cricket and his idea of how colonialism should be opposed” (Carby, 1998 , p. 120, emphasis in original). James’ fictional writing, including Minty Alley, examines working-class people and

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

, a black man native to the island of Antigua, who migrated to Canada in 1975, played cricket when he arrived. For him, this was an expression of his race and masculinity, a source of friendship, fitness and, ultimately, bodily disrepair. Many Caribbean men’s stories about their migration experiences, settling in Toronto’s urban and suburban neighbourhoods, finding jobs, returning home for visits and

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Antonia Lucia Dawes

linguistic dexterity in Neapolitan street markets, particularly if one might be perceived as an outsider. By making a big scene in Neapolitan, and claiming a very specifically Neapolitan street identity, he was showing me how to gain respect and inclusion through the way I spoke. These pragmatic attempts to mitigate difference at my field sites were inextricably linked to the performance of particular kinds of locally hegemonic forms of masculinity (Connell and Messerschmidt 2005 ). Two important examples of these local masculinities included the figure of the guappo

in Race talk