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have been largely ignored by literary criticism. Like Roche, then, Cuthbertson represents the migration of Irish literary production at the start of the nineteenth century and is indicative of the systematic erasure of so much popular fiction from the annals of (Irish) Romantic literature. The relegation of gothic romance writers such as Roche, Cuthbertson, and many of the other authors included in this study to the margins of literary history not only denies the significance of their long-lasting, transnational appeal, but it also emphasises the limitations of

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction

, ultimately proves disastrous for him, it serves several important purposes. First, it highlights the wholesale migration of Irish print culture in this period. Second, it emphasises the precariousness of London literary life for Irish émigré authors like Roche herself. Third, it points to the acute awareness Roche shared with many of her contemporaries of her participation in what Karen O’Brien calls ‘a borderless and mobile European and transatlantic culture of fiction’ that enabled and encouraged cultural transfer and an ongoing reconfiguration of Irishness during the

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Location the Irish gothic novel

See Christina Morin, ‘ “At a distance from [my] country”: Henrietta Rouvière Mosse, the Minerva Press, and the negotiation of Irishness in the Romantic literary marketplace’, European Romantic review , 28.4 (2017), 447–60; and ‘Irish gothic goes abroad: cultural migration, materiality, and the Minerva Press’, in Marguérite Corporaal and Christina Morin (eds), Traveling Irishness in the long nineteenth century (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017), pp. 185

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction

nineteenth-century Irish nationalist writing ‘often explicitly draws on larger geographical networks that establish wide-ranging international comparisons’. 84 Connolly, meanwhile, contends that much nineteenth-century Irish fiction displays ‘a transnational dimension’ devolving from the Irish novel's location at the ‘intersection of [the] dynamics of proximity and distance’ inherent to the realities of the contemporary print industry: with native publishing annihilated in the wake of Union, the migration of Irish authors to London intensified just as the numbers of Irish

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829