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Imaginaries, power, connected worlds
Jeremy C.A. Smith

dimensions of inter-​civilisational engagement:  migration, deep engagement in economic relations, cultural exchange and creation, and political reconstruction of civilisational models. The four dimensions are not exhaustively treated and are analytics for further substantive research, starting with the exploration in chapters in the subsequent part. This chapter features several examples that illustrate aspects of the argument. Most of them are remote from the twenty-​first century and are chosen to illuminate what has generally been neglected:  the very early development

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
Ontologies of connection, reconstruction of memory
Jeremy C.A. Smith

migration. Through voyaging and migration, islander societies expanded, creating and sustaining zones of engagement for millennia before Europeans came. Travel stimulated an imaginary of exchange, the second theme. Exchange cannot be understood with a utilitarian mindset; it is rather an expression of relationship, association and alliance –​engagement broadly speaking. The third theme is the new world context. European colonialism conjoined the Pacific to other civilisations in more extensive engagement. This was a violent and disordering historical experience for the

in Debating civilisations
Peter J. Spiro

might otherwise be blurry. Citizenship helped maintain good fences. But it could do that kind of work only on the margins – in border zones and in the context of limited migration. For the most part, nationality wasn't arbitrary. It reflected social attachment. Today, citizenship no longer serves a border-policing function. Nor could it. The lines have gotten too blurry on the ground. It is no longer clear where one citizenry leaves off and the

in Democratic inclusion
Open Access (free)
A pluralist theory of citizenship
Rainer Bauböck

populations than the provinces or states to which they belong because what counts for the state as internal migration is added to what the state classifies as international migration. We can thus describe multilevel polities without contradiction as simultaneously strongly sedentary and relatively mobile. In a multilevel polity, my normative proposition that sedentariness is a background context for democracy must therefore be specified as applying

in Democratic inclusion
Bill Jordan

lack access to such communities, maybe through something like the Panopticon Villages foreseen by Jeremy Bentham. 16 Finally, a supranational government deals with issues of migration, guaranteeing or supply of mobile workers between communities to staff essential services, and meet labour shortages. Of course, individuals might come under the jurisdiction of any of these at different periods of their lives. One pattern, for instance, might be a

in Political concepts
Open Access (free)
Jeremy C.A. Smith

. Castoriadis’s theory of the imaginary institution informs my development of a notion of inter-​civilisational engagement in which civilisations acquire meaning at the point of inter-​relationship with other social, historical and cultural forms; that is, other civilisational patterns, to use Arnason’s phrase. To recount, there are four dimensions to this inter-​relationship. Interaction occurs through migration, economic relations, cultural exchange and the extension of models of polity and civilisation. The four dimensions of inter-​civilisational engagement featured in

in Debating civilisations
New stories on rafted ice
Elana Wilson Rowe

, just as anyone’ (Mauer, 2010). By the time a channel of ice-​free water was opened, the whales had been given names in both English (Bone, Bonnett and Crossbeak) and Inupiaq (Putu, Siku and Kanik). One whale died during the wait, but it was hoped that the two surviving, but weakened, whales had escaped via the channel opened by the Soviet icebreakers and resumed migration. 18 New stories on rafted ice     19 Figure 1  North Slope (USA) villagers passing a Soviet icebreaker, flying a Soviet flag in 1988. ‘Operation Breakthrough’ received high levels of media

in Arctic governance
Elana Wilson Rowe

documents can all tell a story about the region. This chapter seeks to highlight how these representations of the region –​ or the way in which circumpolar policy issues are framed by narrative and images –​are a manifestation of and serve to shape power relations in the region. Consider the selection of the three maps in Figures 4–​6 as an illustration of the various ways of representing the region. Figure 4 illustrates the bird migration routes connecting one nesting ground in Arctic Alaska with populations around the world. Like the ice-​locked whales discussed in

in Arctic governance
Open Access (free)
Uses and critiques of ‘civilisation’
Jeremy C.A. Smith

and in its ‘War on Terror’. Third, the growth in complexity of migration strained mono-​cultural conceptions of nationality previously prevalent in nation-​states (Castles et  al., 2014). Policies of multiculturalism that have taken their place presuppose a mixed demography and intermingling religions and civilisations. Furthermore, they are premised on continuing diversification. Multiculturalism is fragile and periodically beset by xenophobic reaction. Plurality is undeniable, however, and it is evident not only within states, but in the international arena. The

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
Rainer Bauböck

on Miller's account. Instead, the general duty to justify coercive migration control is enhanced by special responsibilities of states for particular migrants and by those migrants’ vulnerability. Where the responsibility and vulnerability is strong, migrants’ lives are indeed being shaped by a decision to turn them away and they are actually rather than just potentially dominated by the legal system of the country they are trying to enter

in Democratic inclusion