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The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

who disturb his throne, and deluge his country with blood!’ 53 His eventual triumph over the Danes is lauded as a pivotal moment in English history: restored to the throne, Alfred is said ‘to dispense the blessings of peace and security to his people’, through the exercise of ‘his military abilities’ and ‘his just and vigorous laws’ ( Son of Ethelwolf , p. 277). Under his leadership, ‘[c]ommerce, till then unknown or neglected, poured the products of far distant realms into his dominions, and learning, cherished by his fostering care, broke the fetters with which

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

Lusignan Dellbury’ (pp. 33–4). Thomas establishes Sir Lusignan’s pedigree as kin, wealthy, titled and one of many candidates for Camilla. Camilla evinces no preference for him but accepts him to comply with her parents and because his character and military achievements have fixed his position in the public world: 76 The many

in Gothic incest
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‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott
Christina Morin

Walpole himself was seriously disaffected with British politics. Over the course of 1763 and 1764, Walpole and his much loved cousin, Henry Seymour Conway, found themselves at odds with the majority feeling in the Commons over a debate centred on the arrest of John Wilkes for seditious libel – a charge related to statements Wilkes had made about the King in the North Briton . Severe repercussions fell on Conway, who, in April 1764, was deprived of the civil and military posts he held; so enraged was Walpole at this turn of events that he resolved to overthrow a

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction
Christina Morin

ghost of Strongbow tired and stale, the Gentleman's Magazine praised White for his originality: ‘The ghost of an antient baron, who stands high in the chronicles of military renown, rehearsing his adventures, in a narration continued through several progressive nights, each of which forms a chapter, is an idea that has not been started by any other writer’. 6 White's next novel, The adventures of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster (1790), also met a mixed reception owing to its striking combination of quasi-factual historical

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

misunderstood. 98 Following his failed military career, O’Neil finds himself imprisoned for treason after Mordaunt – disguised as the apparently benevolent Mr Wilkinson – tricks him into copying out a ‘seditious’ and ‘inflammatory’ radical tract ( The castle chapel , vol. 2, p. 41). O’Neil nevertheless naively agrees moments afterwards to deliver a packet of ‘papers of consequence’ for Mordaunt to a bookseller ( The castle chapel , vol. 2, p. 42). The receipt for this delivery bears O’Neil's name and is later used as evidence that he is the author of what he has so

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Location the Irish gothic novel
Christina Morin

with more far-flung communities in order to underline the role that tourism, exile, and military travel play in the assertion of Irish national significance in the early nineteenth century. Expanding the notion of literary cartography addressed in Chapter 3 , Chapter 4 considers the materiality of Irish gothic literature, taking its cue from Andrew Piper's convincing call to ‘combin[e] an analysis of the movements and fixations of texts with the movements and fixations within texts’. 58 Such an approach enables a mapping of texts as

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829