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The beginning of aesthetic theory and the end of art

individuality. In the view which argues for the limits of the reflection model it is precisely the ontological gap between myself and the other inherent in the fact of immediate self-consciousness which gives rise to the need for new forms of articulation and expression. While these forms are intersubjectively constituted – Beethoven uses many of the musical conventions of his time – they can yet be employed in unique, individual ways. Let us see, then, how Hegel arrives at his position. The Phenomenology of Spirit (PG) (1807) is an account of the stages of this process of

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
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Art as the ‘organ of philosophy’

be separate from me, even though I have no cognitive access to it. The ‘imagination’ itself therefore has a history: the actions which lead to its development can be traced by reflection upon the actions it now performs. This history starts from the lowest form of sensation, in which there is a difference between one thing and its other, and rises to the highest point of being able to reflect philosophically upon the relationship of thinking to what exists. Philosophy, argues Schelling, in a view usually attributed to Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, must be concerned

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
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Time and space

,” variously named as “trans-modernity,” “border knowledge,” and “de-colonial perspectives.” 50 At the same time, these ethically segregated entities continue to enact, within a shared historical stage, a principled drama, an endless clash between good and bad, virtue and evil, morality and immorality. Moreover, while Dussel’s original claims concerned a supersession of phenomenology by an ethically oriented

in Subjects of modernity
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rejects the systematic side of Hegel in favour of a Conclusion 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 333 (Romantic) open-ended dialectic, he would not make the distinction between the public and the private in exactly the way Hegel does. For example, he regards the Phenomenology in much the same way as I do, that is, as in some respects being more significant as a ‘private’ text. My difference from Rorty is described below. In some respects this is reminiscent of Kant’s idea, in the Foundation of the Metaphysics of Morals, that we can never finally know if we act morally, as there

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Kant

’s account of ‘Lordship and Bondage’ in the Phenomenology of Mind in these terms. In modern capitalism it is more and more possible to be in the position of the consuming, unproductive lord and not to be in the position of the bondsman who can develop into the genius. In modernity art can express what is repressed by our cognitive and economic control of nature, and by our Modern philosophy and aesthetic theory 41 disciplining of ourselves under the division of labour. However, the increasing domination of our self-descriptions by the discoveries of the natural sciences

in Aesthetics and subjectivity

easy to distinguish from language than he claims. The central issue here is what deconstruction, in the wake of Heidegger, calls the ‘metaphysics of presence’. What the term refers to is exemplified in Hegel’s account of language in the Phenomenology. Derrida has characterised what he means by metaphysics as ‘presence’ in terms of reflexive ‘hearing oneself speaking’, and this idea is apparent in Hegel’s comments, in which the individual subject hears itself speaking via the language it shares with other subjects. Hegel describes language as the existence of Geist. It

in Aesthetics and subjectivity