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learning that Leo Levy had an extra two years of life. And of course – chillingly – this belated information brings the story back again to chemistry. To Primo Levi, also enslaved there, and to my father’s own connections with the German chemical industry. hH Article 116 (2) of the German Basic Law concerns the rights of descendants of those deprived of German citizenship on political, racial or religious grounds to apply for naturalisation. Now, writing in the immediate aftermath of the Brexit vote, I am compiling the documents I need to demonstrate my eligibility for

in Austerity baby
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school to steer their son in the direction of science and mathematics and away from the traditional Classics education. It seems this was – or became – Ernest’s own desire too. About his father’s note he comments: ‘Rarely has paternal advice and example been more wholeheartedly accepted.’ There is something rather melancholy in reading about the life of Ernest Simon. He succeeded in everything he did, from running the family businesses to political activities and important social projects later on. He had an exceptionally happy marriage to a woman – Shena Potter – with

in Austerity baby
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grandparents’ house in Fraulautern. Like its neighbours in France, Alsace and Lorraine, the Saarland has had a complicated history of national affiliation, before and during the twentieth century. Through the nineteenth century the region was divided between France, Bavaria and Prussia, before being incorporated into the German empire in 1871. After the First World War French troops occupied the Saar. From an online encyclopaedia: The Saar Territory came into existence as a political unit when the Treaty of Versailles (1919) made it an autonomous territory, administered by

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uncongenial to me as the colour itself. Early 1979 – I’m not sure of the exact date. By then, there were only three of us still living in a collective house in Leeds, after a falling-out the previous autumn, during my three-month absence in the United States. Complicated personal relations, sexual politics and other problems I was kept informed about – I assume it must have been by letter, since there was no email then and I don’t recall many phone calls. It was a large, four-storey terraced house, five minutes Colour (mainly blue) [ 67 ] [ 68 ] from the university

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the mother’s flamboyant, floral patterned robe ( Plate 3 ). Elsewhere in the pamphlet are many other partially coloured, heavily retouched photographs, through which the highlighted tans of ‘Homesun’ users become more and more pronounced, if not outright alien ( Plate 5 ). This chapter is devoted to the subject of suntan (pigmentation) and the social and political significance of the British public’s avid consumption of

in Soaking up the rays
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on the visualising and therapeutic powers of light during the early twentieth century. Metaphors of light and darkness prevail in discussions of her work. Her radical political beliefs in Communism, supported by the Popular Front in Britain, fuelled her interest in bringing to light the ‘shadow’ of social injustice, especially through her documentary photographs of dark slums and abject poverty in both Austria and England. 70 Lobby groups such as

in Soaking up the rays
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of 1945, a year before her death. From her earliest years in politics, initially as a Liverpool City councillor from 1909 to 1935, she had taken up feminist causes, including women’s suffrage, payments to seamen’s wives, pensions for widows and, later, the situation of women and children in India. She was elected to Parliament in 1929 as one of the two MPs for the Combined English Universities (a two-member constituency added in 1918 to give representation to the new provincial universities and lasting until 1950), and was as dedicated and energetic a campaigner on

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works near Manchester engaged on chemical manufacture for the leather industry … A pathologist in the pathological laboratories of Manchester University. A distinguished German Jewish dentist who had to leave the west coast town where he was practising, and, as he was therefore without a practice, was interned. A young chemistry research student of six years’ standing at Manchester University, son of a famous German Jewish doctor. Lafitte, a young researcher working for Political and Educational Planning at the time, played a crucial role in the opposition to

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embellishments of Zander’s mechanical horse, c . 1892. 8 Graeme Gooday, Domesticating Electricity: Technology, Uncertainty and Gender, 1880–1914 ( London : Pickering & Chatto, 2008), pp. 9, 20. On ‘domestication’, see also Thomas de la Peña, Body Electric , p. 3; Chris Otter, The Victorian Eye: A Political History of Light and

in Soaking up the rays
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beaches of the Côte d’Azur to Hans Surén’s (1885–1972) Nachtkultur (Naked Culture) movement in Germany ( Fig. 1.1 , central image). Light therapy developed globally, used throughout Continental Europe, North America, North Africa, Russia, India, and New Zealand. 84 In these varied locations the political meaning and value of bodily exposure to light also varied considerably, Paul Overy explaining

in Soaking up the rays