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learning that Leo Levy had an extra two years of life. And of course – chillingly – this belated information brings the story back again to chemistry. To Primo Levi, also enslaved there, and to my father’s own connections with the German chemical industry. hH Article 116 (2) of the German Basic Law concerns the rights of descendants of those deprived of German citizenship on political, racial or religious grounds to apply for naturalisation. Now, writing in the immediate aftermath of the Brexit vote, I am compiling the documents I need to demonstrate my eligibility for

in Austerity baby
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Cult of Single Blessedness affirmed the vocational life of unmarried women. Celibacy was perceived by some as a healthy choice, as well as, in religious discourses, a moral one. In particular, the good works done by single women, free from the demands of marriage and motherhood, contributed to their promotion as admirable beings: [ 206 ] Antebellum culture correlated goodness with usefulness, and usefulness with happiness … Noble work of high purpose provided the only meaningful satisfaction in life … Single blessedness, then, assured unmarried women eternal grace

in Austerity baby
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the dutiful one of study, a good facility for quickly grasping information and rules (I excelled in Latin and Maths especially), and a constant Annunciation [ 219 ] [ 220 ] eye on what was required for approval and for getting things right. In a way, I also think this explains the choice, eventually, of an academic career, and before that the decision to work for several years as a secretary. (There is still a real pleasure in filing, putting things in alphabetical order, getting beautiful stationery, attending to all the necessary administrative aspects of life

in Austerity baby
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It is only within quite recent times that the question of utilizing the sun’s rays for the purpose of the prevention or cure of disease, or other objects of health, has been seriously considered and practically applied. Like most of the greatest things in life, the very simplicity and obviousness of the method – at any rate the

in Soaking up the rays