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Learning from communities in informal settlements in Durban, South Africa
Maria Christina Georgiadou and Claudia Loggia

, settlements that mushroom on vacant land, within and around places of opportunities, without proper planning, building regulations or standard construction methods (Khalifa, 2015 ). Informal settlements have been traditionally considered as ‘urban substandard’ schemes, providing low-cost housing to the urban poor under poor living conditions, health risks and environmental hazards (Sutherland et al . , 2016 ). However, Roy ( 2011 ) suggests a progressive interpretation of informal settlements as spaces of habitation, livelihood, self-organisation and politics. As

in African cities and collaborative futures
Stavros Stavrides

urban emancipation commoning traditions. And the third explores advanced potentialities of emancipatory commoning that were created in selfmanaged autonomous neighborhoods produced by politically engaged social movements. All three chapters are more than case studies. In each of them, theory issues connected to the prospect of reformulating the problem of cohabitation in the context of this book’s argument about emancipatory commoning are discussed. From the first to the third of these chapters there emerges a kind of progressive proliferation of emancipatory

in Common spaces of urban emancipation
Marcos P. Dias

in urban space is mobile methods research, described by Büscher, Urry and Witchger ( 2011 : 4) as a ‘project of establishing a “movement-driven” social science’ where movement is ‘constitutive of economic, social and political relations’. This involves a series of techniques that I employed in my research on participation in A Machine To See With : observing and following people and objects, ‘“participating” in patterns of movement while simultaneously conducting research’, making recordings on the move (through audio, photos and videos), getting participants to

in The machinic city
Abstract only
Marcos P. Dias

structures where relations are always emergent (and where desire is always present). However, I argue that this tension is not resolved by pitting these machines against each other, but by investigating the potential to assemble them. My own analysis of these machines is limited to an assemblage that I have deemed important for the purpose of this book. However, there are many other machines that constitute the machinic city that I haven’t analysed in depth, and that deserve to be probed further (through the assemblages that they generate), such as: political, social

in The machinic city
Małgorzata Jakimów

spatial strategies of migrant workers’ struggle for urban citizenship (see Swider, 2015 ; Kochan, 2019 ; Qian and Zhu, 2014 ; Qian and He, 2012 ; Ren, 2012 ), these observations have yet to transpire in political science's discussions of migrant workers’ activism, which are dominated by the focus on labour and/or resistance to the state. This is important because the claim areas of civic organising and labour do not really address migrant workers’ marginalisation within the cities and their figurative and legal exclusion from urban citizenship. Neither labour nor

in China’s citizenship challenge
Abstract only
Paul Dobraszczyk

sexual 302 Destruction and political intrigues and lavish costume design, demonstrate that the appeal of the Tudors is most definitely not limited to children. In the popular imagination, Tudor buildings and their inhabitants signal a golden age in British history – a time when the elusive but much-coveted notion of Britishness revealed itself most strongly. Of course, this is mostly a myth, and a dangerously seductive one at that in these post-Brexit times; but perhaps we can at least celebrate Tudor architecture for its exemplary adaptability – its seeming ability

in Manchester
Abstract only
Steve Hanson

banners and waited for whatever would come next. Being homeless is tolerated, but organising as the homeless is now criminalised. This camp was then controversially cleared, and the council put all the sleeping bags from this occupation into a skip. Rumours suggest they were burned. This point is not just interesting incidental detail; it is a main political juncture. When the focal centres of city neoliberal governance are disrupted by those who are not part of its programme – consumption, tourism, spectacle – they are cleared from those spectacular surfaces, as key

in Manchester
Philip Lawton

future Creating a more liveable city as an integral part of the development of a better urban society will take a reassessment of the connections between existing social and political structures and the social relationships that they help to produce. Given the scale of impact of the economic downturn and its connection to the built environment, any rethinking of urban life must have at its centre a belief in achieving a more equitable society. Picking up on ideas such as the ‘just city’ (Fainstein, 2010) or the ‘right to the city’ (Harvey, 2008; Lefebvre, 1968), it is

in Spacing Ireland
Abstract only
Morag Rose

when I listen to heartbreaking stories, generously shared, of racism, transphobia and other prejudices; so many bullies working to control space and erase dissent. I rage at the fear and abuse that limits so many of us in so many ways. This is not a criticism of those who stay inside for their own safety. It is valid and true and awful to feel scared, and I regret that; despite my beliefs, it restricts me too sometimes. As ever, the personal is political.3 One particular incident has really haunted me. I’d been to a house party just a bit too close to home to justify

in Manchester
Abstract only
Natalie Bradbury

‘Northern Quarter’ and Ancoats locales, the initials snappily indicate its geographical location: NOrth of MAnchester city centre. For all its blandness, NOMA belies a more interesting identity, and one that is far more important to the history of the city and its social, cultural, political and architectural development than just a series of initials. In fact, the area could more accurately be branded the ‘Co-operative Quarter’, largely comprising the former estate of the Co-operative Group, the largest co-operative society in the UK, a major local employer, and an

in Manchester