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Pluralism and the politics of change in Canada’s national museums
Ruth B. Phillips

video presentations, a billboard piece in the old market area nearby, and satellite exhibits in nine other art galleries and exhibition spaces in the city. The NGC curators Greg Hill and Christine Lalonde, and guest curator Candice Hopkins, are specialists in North American Aboriginal art. Working with an international advisory committee scattered around the globe, they selected seventy-seven artists from Canada, the USA, Greenland, Australia, Aotearoa New Zealand, Samoa, Hawai’i, Mexico, Columbia, Brazil, Japan, Taiwan, India and Scandinavia.29 Other messages were

in Curatopia
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The widening gyre
Catherine J. Frieman

implicate a web of relations among people, things, ideas, and practices. That both the lone genius and the iconic invention are bound up in the discourse of colonialism and oppression – here in Australia, the reactionary right like to tout the invention of the wheel as some sort of trump card in favor of white supremacy – is reason enough to find other narratives to champion. Work by feminist anthropologists has highlighted how the sterile and rational world of capital, debt, exchange, and production is itself a mask hiding a rather more scuffed and complex

in An archaeology of innovation
Catherine J. Frieman

understandings of how and why people began (or ceased) to do new things. This is visible, for example, in many of the assumptions underlying current debates about the peopling of Sahul – the large landmass that includes continental Australia, Tasmania, New Guinea, Seram, and adjacent Indonesian islands. We have well-dated archaeological sites from Indonesia to Tasmania placing human occupation of Sahul between 40,000 and 50,000 years ago. Recent archaeological work at Majedbebe (Northern Territory) suggests that the earliest colonization of Australia may have taken place over

in An archaeology of innovation
Anthony Alan Shelton

Musées royaux d’Art et d’Histoire, Brussels, Belgium. 13 Museum voor Volkenkunde, Rotterdam, Netherlands. 14 The Pyramid, Memphis, Egypt, and Florida International Museum, Saint Petersburg, USA. 15 Petit Palais, Paris, France. 16 City Art Centre, Edinburgh, UK. 17 Metropolitan Museum, New York, USA. 18 National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. 19 National Geographic Museum, Washington DC, and the Irving Arts Centre. USA. 20 Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC, USA. 21 Musée des Beaux Arts, Montreal, Glenbow Museum, Calgary, Canada

in Curatopia
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A Tongan ‘akau in New England
Ivan Gaskell

Experiences (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2014), pp. 206–46. See also Kahanu, Nepia and Schorch, Chapter 18 below. 17 G. Edgers, ‘Ritual Offerings, Peabody Essex Museum’, Boston Globe (10 August 2006), quoting a museum spokesperson. I repeat this observation from I.  Gaskell,  ‘Encountering Pacific Art’, Journal of Museum Ethnography, 21 (2009), 202–10. 18 T.P. Kāwika Tengan, ‘The Mana of Kū: Indigenous Nationhood, Masculinity and Authority in Hawai’i’, in New Mana: Transformations of a Classic Concept in Pacific Languages and Cultures (Canberra: Australian

in Curatopia
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Ing-Marie Back Danielsson and Andrew Meirion Jones

images alter (as archaeologists, as anthropologists, as artists) when we consider the image not as a static entity, but in-themaking. In that sense, we agree with Gosden and Malafouris’s (2015) plea for a focus on process in archaeological analysis. Our focus on process here is more modest than Gosden and Malafouris’s expansive prospectus and we mainly pursue art and images as they emerge in practices of making and engagement in the past, and through practices of analysis in the present. The Australian artist and theorist Barbara Bolt (2004: 13–14) draws our attention

in Images in the making
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Katherine Fennelly

planners in ways that are rarely recorded explicitly. So, what does an archaeology of lunacy look like? While lunacy in the past was not exclusively institutional, the study of historic asylums allows for a quantitative survey of the ways in which lunacy was conceived of and treated. This study of the subject of lunacy and asylums focuses, therefore, on the archaeology of those institutions where lunacy was managed within a framework: the asylums. Approaches to this subject in the United States and Australia have drawn heavily on historical

in An archaeology of lunacy
Curatorial bodies, encounters and relations
Noelle M.K.Y. Kahanu, Moana Nepia, and Philipp Schorch

18 He alo aˉ he alo / kanohi ki te kanohi / face-to-face: curatorial bodies, encounters and relations Noelle M.K.Y. Kahanu, Moana Nepia and Philipp Schorch In spring 2016, two of the authors, Noelle Kahanu and Moana Nepia, boarded a plane from Honolulu, Hawai‘i, to Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand, destined for the Pacific Arts Association conference. Kahanu had previously initiated a consultation project between the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Hawai‘i, Native Hawaiian cultural practitioners and museums in Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia. The most significant

in Curatopia
From Samoa with Love? at the Museum Fünf Kontinente, Munich
Hilke Thode-Arora

Germany between 1895 and 1911 with the Marquardt brothers, and to match these names with the faces in the historical photos of the show. This was the starting point in reconstructing their villages of origin and locating descendants in Samoa, Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia whom I could ask about Samoan perspectives. These conversations provoked a number of genealogical stories, oral history narratives of the Samoan travellers’ lives before and after their participation in the tours, and their impressions while in Germany. There were also material reminiscences

in Curatopia
Jette Sandahl

, Indigenous-driven museums in  other parts of the world, like the NMAI, Te Papa or the National Museum of Australia, carrying a – in professional circles often only whispered, hinted 5.5  A table setting from a marae (the work Nemesis, by artist Reuben Patterson), and a paˉtaka (food storehouse) all to be interpreted as commentary on the theme of sustainability, in the exhibition E Tū Ake (as Leurs trésors sont une âme) at the Musée du Quai Branly, Paris, France, 2011. 81 82 Europe and ­intimated – delegitimisation of the epistemologies of Indigenous curating. The

in Curatopia