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Shareholders and directors
Andrew Mackillop

The emergence from the 1690s to the early 1740s of sustained links between the EIC and expatriate social networks in London constituted a vital prerequisite for wider involvement in the corporation and its operations overseas. That demonstrable influence in the city was required for metropolitan provincial participation in one whole hemisphere of the Empire provides cogent support for the concept of gentlemanly capitalism and its focus on the central role of London. Yet the extent and nature of the city’s control remains a matter of debate. Although there has

in Human capital and empire
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‘Poor’ Europe’s pathways to empire and globalisation
Andrew Mackillop

global economic system. 8 Not the least of these is the need to rethink the place of London and the metropolitan provinces in the long eighteenth-century phase of British expansion and empire. How are concepts of gentlemanly and gentry capitalism to be configured if migrants were a mode of investment which was more mobile in many ways than the monetary assets that defined the City’s economic dominance? Another benefit of connecting societies like Ireland and Scotland to London and to transnational institutions like the United English East India Company is that the

in Human capital and empire
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Family matters: Slavery, commerce and culture
Katie Donington

family, the book demonstrates how the Hibberts’ story imbricates the personal and the political, the private and the public, the local and the global. It is both the particular narrative of an extended family and a frame through which to negotiate Britain’s multifaceted engagement with the business of slavery. Commerce Family capitalism was the backbone of British business during

in The bonds of family
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Nicola Ginsburgh

intolerant lower classes has much in common with how racism has been represented and understood globally. Racism has often been portrayed as a problem confined to a rabid, insular and illiterate white working class; whether white trash or rednecks in the United States, chavs in the United Kingdom or poor whites in South Africa. Of course, lower-class whites have not been passive bearers of elite constructions of race, but this focus often deliberately obscures the role of capitalism, the state and the rich in perpetuating racist inequalities. Despite the existence of some

in Class, work and whiteness
Nicola Ginsburgh

’ union in 1902 before moving on to Rhodesia in 1910. 18 Donald Macintyre, former Glaswegian apprentice and member of the British Labour Party, became a leading member of the RLP. 19 The trade union and labour movement in Rhodesia was shaped by these men’s experiences of struggle and political education in the metropole and other imperial locations. But the radicalism and racism of white workers was not simply a matter of transposing ideas from one context to another; they were rooted in capitalism and engendered through their experience of the racial monopoly of

in Class, work and whiteness
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Realising the human capital economy
Andrew Mackillop

immediately engaged in contests against interests aligned with Sulivan. 16 This transfer of proprietary court factionalism into parliamentary seats occurred too in Scotland. The leverage exerted by the Johnstone of Westerhall faction at Leadenhall Street and in certain districts of Scotland corresponds closely to the gentry capitalism identified in relation to Yorkshire families active in the slavery based trades of the British Caribbean. 17 In both cases the resultant networks combined local and regional kinship links with the use of imperial profits and transnational

in Human capital and empire
Andrew Mackillop

fact that the vessel’s commander was a kinsman and namesake of Torphichen. It was through such seemingly prosaic interchanges that micro-networks centred on kin links morphed into meso-level networks. 66 The effect was to connect kith and kin interests in the metropolitan provinces to one of the most capital-reliant sectors of British gentlemanly capitalism. Lawyers were not the only agents generating avenues into the shipping interest. As increasing numbers of EIC personnel returned home in the 1760s and 1770s, profits acquired in one area of the corporation were

in Human capital and empire
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Economies of high- and low-value human capital
Andrew Mackillop

fraternities’ and porous national boundaries. 24 This ‘military Europe’ facilitated the search for veteran officers with a high human capital value and for large volumes of low-value rank and file. The EIC’s militarism evolved as a potent mixture of London gentlemanly capitalism and older economies of military migration associated with mountainous-pastoral regions like the Swiss Cantons, Ireland and Scotland. This military complex interlaced economies of human and finance capital in ways that offered substantial opportunities to Irish and Scottish society. Supposedly ‘semi

in Human capital and empire
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Collecting and connoisseurship
Katie Donington

, 1758), p. 125 Robert Lloyd’s satirical representation of the pretensions of the wealthy man of trade is indicative of the ways in which culture demarcated the difference between traditional and emerging forms of wealth. Consumer culture, buoyed by capitalism and colonisation, created a new world of things and a new class of people able to participate

in The bonds of family
Nicola Ginsburgh

, frustrate African trade unions, stem the rise of an African middle class or prevent African movement into towns and cities. 4 Capitalism is a dynamic system. Class formations are continually reshaped by changes in capitalism as some industries decline in importance and newer ones take their place. This process brings new layers of workers into wage labour while discarding others. 5 The Rhodesian workforce was continually restructured by new demands created by emerging industries. These changes disrupted the ways in which particular occupations were understood as

in Class, work and whiteness