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Collecting and connoisseurship
Katie Donington

, 1758), p. 125 Robert Lloyd’s satirical representation of the pretensions of the wealthy man of trade is indicative of the ways in which culture demarcated the difference between traditional and emerging forms of wealth. Consumer culture, buoyed by capitalism and colonisation, created a new world of things and a new class of people able to participate

in The bonds of family
Nicola Ginsburgh

, frustrate African trade unions, stem the rise of an African middle class or prevent African movement into towns and cities. 4 Capitalism is a dynamic system. Class formations are continually reshaped by changes in capitalism as some industries decline in importance and newer ones take their place. This process brings new layers of workers into wage labour while discarding others. 5 The Rhodesian workforce was continually restructured by new demands created by emerging industries. These changes disrupted the ways in which particular occupations were understood as

in Class, work and whiteness
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Affective buildings and emotional communities on Martinique, Guadeloupe, and Haiti
Benjamin Steiner

. 75–108. 17 Trevor Burnard and John Garrigus, The Plantation Machine: Atlantic Capitalism in French Saint-Domingue and British Jamaica (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016), p. 50. 18 CAOM 15DFC/5, No. 617 and 618

in Building the French empire, 1600–1800
The colony
Katie Donington

family life, but reliance on such a volatile and violent practice caused deep uncertainty. Both merchant capitalism and transatlantic slavery were risky trades; the angst that Robert junior expressed was not related to any moral uneasiness with his situation, but rather a realisation that despite his great wealth, his style of life was reliant on the maintenance of two

in The bonds of family
Nicola Ginsburgh

to starvation or homelessness, but rather an inability to afford domestic staff and the iniquity of consuming mealie meal; namely, the failure to adhere to ‘white’ standards of living. Both the RLP and RRWU used white poverty to challenge the characterisation of white workers as lazy and insisted that those thrown into poverty were at the behest of unscrupulous bosses and international capitalism as well as ‘do-gooder’ missionaries intent on educating Africans. They were also keen to highlight the apparent criminalisation of poverty as a stain on the Rhodesian

in Class, work and whiteness
Nicola Ginsburgh

by a clerk in Bulawayo appeared alongside several songs from Songs of Work and Freedom , a collection of folk songs from the United States that glorified trade union struggle, class warfare and denounced the inequalities engendered by capitalism. 154 It also continued to carry biographies of leading figures including Herbert Walsh and Davy Payne and their struggles to establish trade unionism in Rhodesia. 155 This was a sense of class division and an identity rooted in the concept of a working man. The fact that the sweeping tide of decolonisation had failed to

in Class, work and whiteness
Constance Backhouse, Ann Curthoys, Ian Duncanson, and Ann Parsonson

class, gender and ethnicity, ‘culture’ and geography can be articulated, relations of domination and subordination theorized, and resistance plotted. Conclusion Stasiulis and Yuval-Davis pointed out how ‘few analyses of settler societies have examined how settler capitalism exacerbated and transformed relations based simultaneously on colonialism

in Law, history, colonialism
Rory M. Miller and Robert G. Greenhill

‘gentlemanly capitalism’ during the 1980s. Cain and Hopkins argued that one outstanding feature of the late nineteenth century was ‘the reassertion of London’s pre-eminence as a centre of power in comparison with the industrial provinces, which had been the main source of political and social dynamism earlier in the century’. 5 This process reflected the relative decline of Britain

in The empire in one city?
The Pennants’ Jamaican plantations and industrialisation in North Wales, 1771–1812
Trevor Burnard

, Sugar and Slavery: An Economic History of the British West Indies, 1623–1775 (Bridgetown, 1974), pp. 496–7. For general issues of measurement, see John J. McCusker, ‘Weights and measures in the colonial sugar trade: the gallon and the pound and their international equivalents’, William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd ser., 30 (1973), 599–624, and S. D. Smith, Slavery, Family and Gentry Capitalism in the British Atlantic: The World of the Lascelles, 1648–1834 (Cambridge, 2006), p. 249

in Wales and the British overseas empire
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The cultural construction of the British world
Barry Crosbie and Mark Hampton

British ‘unbridled capitalism’ could flourish even as Britain itself developed a welfare state ‘consensus’. Drawing on political pamphlets, novels, memoirs, journalistic accounts, politicians’ speeches and trade organisations’ papers, it argues that Hong Kong was widely seen by expatriates as a place in which British values survived after having been quashed in a ‘declining’ Britain. At the same

in The cultural construction of the British world