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Churnjeet Mahn, Sarita Malik, Michael Pierse, and Ben Rogaly

How can we maintain hope for a more equal world? In this chapter we outline the theory and practice that undergirded our solidarity in the project. The chapter contains some of the readings, the references, the routes, that we all brought to the project to understand how creative forms of resistance have responded to hostile environments, and why. We begin by revisiting bell hooks’ work on ‘radical openness’, not to be confused with the United Nations’ adoption of radical openness as a template for transparent working and resilience. Indeed

in Creativity and resistance in a hostile world
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Creativity and resistance in a hostile world
Sarita Malik, Churnjeet Mahn, Michael Pierse, and Ben Rogaly

Writing this in the midst of the UK's exit from the EU (31 January 2020), we find ourselves at the threshold of a different Britain. When we began work on the Creative Interruptions project in 2014, we couldn't have imagined that by the time we came to write this book we would have witnessed three UK general elections (2015, 2017 and 2019) and two referendums (Scottish independence in 2014; EU referendum in 2016). We didn't plan or factor in alongside our work on the project, which incorporates research on anti-racist activism and advocating

in Creativity and resistance in a hostile world
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The complexities of ‘radical openness’ in collaborative research
Daisy Hasan-Bounds, Sarita Malik, and Jasber Singh

The Creative Interruptions project brought researchers from five UK universities and several non-university-based collaborators together to explore the political role of the arts and creativity within disenfranchised communities. 1 At its heart was the concept of co-creation, the process of producing and collecting knowledge in collaborative ways. 2 The Introduction and Chapter 1 in this volume reveal the scope and context of Creative

in Creativity and resistance in a hostile world
Shelley Tracey and Joe Allen

7 Collage-making for interdisciplinary research skills training in Northern Ireland Shelley Tracey and Joe Allen Setting the scene T his chapter shares our practice of collage-making for identifying and extending ideas for research in a course entitled Creative Thinking and Problem Solving (CTPS), part of a postgraduate research training programme. The programme provides a range of opportunities for doctoral students across the university to develop skills for designing, writing and presenting their dissertations and managing the demands of a PhD process

in Lifelong learning, the arts and community cultural engagement in the contemporary university
A tale of two professors
Randee Lipson Lawrence and Patricia Cranton

challenges the myth of the researcher as a distant outsider, debunking the researcher’s privilege of rationality and positivism. We argue the potential of using alternative creative processes for conducting research in the academy, focusing in particular on the crucial role of the research adviser. We also believe arts-based qualitative research can engage all of our senses and bring forth extra-rational knowledge that has the capacity to bridge cultural differences and promote transformation and social justice, in agreement with Finley (2008: 72) who argues ‘at the heart

in Lifelong learning, the arts and community cultural engagement in the contemporary university
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Darlene E. Clover and Kathy Sanford

Introduction Darlene E. Clover and Kathy Sanford We need to transgress boundaries and take risks with our programmes, our learners and ourselves as adult educators. (Lipson Lawrence, 2005: 81) I Universities should be the places where we fearlessly encourage complex thinking and doing, creating and collaborating. (Burnett, 2011) maginatively educate. Aesthetically elucidate. Visually illuminate. Creatively investigate. Theatrically explicate. Artistically animate. Performatively resonate. These concepts characterise the innovation, energy and courage Lipson

in Lifelong learning, the arts and community cultural engagement in the contemporary university
Tom Woodin

work that arose from workshops bore the marks of a more literary approach than other texts published by Fed groups, which might have involved an editorial group working with a single writer. In writing workshops, complex, onerous and prolonged feedback on multiple drafts ensured this was the case. Liz Thompson’s Just a Cotchell: Tales from a Dockland’s Childhood and Beyond has many of the hallmarks of a novel. Thompson developed her book through involvement with Basement Writers, which provided a launch pad into a creative exploration of her past. She developed a

in Working-class writing and publishing in the late twentieth century
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Messages, threads and tensions
Kathy Sanford and Darlene E. Clover

_Sandford.indd 175 05/04/2013 09:03 lifelong learning and the arts The wall of rationality, tradition and neoliberalism Shukaitis, Graeber and Biddle once asked why it was that we ‘assume creative and relevant ideas should be coming out of the universities in the first place?’ (2005: 15). They go on to say that modern universities have only existed for a few hundred years and during this time have not really fostered much in terms of new ways of learning and understanding or engaging with the world. Public universities are challenged by current socio-political changes in the

in Lifelong learning, the arts and community cultural engagement in the contemporary university
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Cosmologies of substance, production, and accumulation in Central Mozambique
Bjørn Enge Bertelsen

historically contingent wider concerns with both production and various phases of Mozambican state formation, as I have also developed elsewhere (Bertelsen forthcoming). The argument is theoretically concerned with what is sometimes analysed as cosmology’s central dynamic: perceptions of the workings of creative and degenerative forces present in different social and cultural orders (see, e.g., Beidelman 1966). Specifically the chapter will expose how the mill creates intense concerns through engaging households’ production, substance, and accumulation. Such instances, I

in Framing cosmologies
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Blended understandings of symbolic forces in London-French education on-land and on-line
Saskia Huc-Hepher

-land interviews and attended by ‘French’ children in London. In the on-line case-study, I foreground the aspects of the UK education model that my on-land participants value most, including the practice-based approach, the emphasis on positive encouragement and participation, teacher–student equality, the valuing of the individual, and the development of oral, sporting and creative skills, alongside employability. By conducting this blended, ethnosemiotic analysis, I seek to understand why the majority of my research participants favour the English educational model (a

in French London