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Relationships and issues, 1941–45
Andrew Williams

final ‘brew’ in 1943–45, once they were discussed and then discarded, adapted or adopted by the Big Four at their Conferences. The main aim of this chapter is to elucidate that policy process, particularly as it applied to the future of Germany and, by extension, the whole of Europe. A secondary aim of the chapter is to show how the Allies interacted as they went about this policy-making process. The purpose of this is twofold: first to show that the resulting compromises in effect gave rise to tensions that were to be both creative (as in the decisions taken about

in Failed imagination?

Edited and introduced by Nobel Laureate John Hume, T.G. Fraser and Leonie Murray, this book provides a range of unique insights into the issues surrounding peacemaking, delivered by major international figures with direct experience in this area at the highest level. Based on a series of lectures on the theme of ‘Peace’ given under the auspices of the Tip O’Neill Chair in Peace Studies at the University of Ulster’s Magee campus and funded by The Ireland Funds, each lecture is presented with an introduction placing it in its proper context within the discourse on peacemaking. The volume makes an invaluable contribution to the study of peace and conflict studies, international history, international relations and international politics.

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Alternative approaches to violence in International Relations
Cerwyn Moore

This introductory chapter tries to form a set of themes and a broad body of literature which could be creatively used to study the alternative accounts of contemporary violence in the study of international relations. It examines the work of scholars concerned with meaning in international relations and shows how paramilitaries, international aid groups, human rights organisations, transnational media-corporations, militias and inter-governmental organisations are all involved in contemporary war. This chapter also studies a body of interpretive work that helps connect area studies and social networks with studies of narrative identity.

in Contemporary violence
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Reclaiming global politics
Cerwyn Moore

, creatively, to explore alternative accounts of contemporary violence in International Relations. Chapter 1 sought to introduce the phenomenological roots of hermeneutic studies, while also establishing a link to narratives accounts of identity. Thereafter the goal of Chapter 2, and the book as a whole was to explore the local social, historical and cultural dynamics which shaped the armed resistance movements in the latter part of the 1990s. Chapter 2 then introduced the two case studies and offered some preliminary historical details, while Chapter 3 built on this move

in Contemporary violence
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Paul Arthur

plant and that leaders have to bring their constituencies with them. But like all political midwives they grow concerned that too much nurturing can lead to a form of infantilism – we can see why Galtung falls back on the psychological. Indeed it is only Dermot Ahern and Maurice Hayes who can begin to properly indulge in the sunny uplands. Following the literature on peace studies it is Dr Hayes who takes the debate to a new level when he invokes so strongly the forgotten art of the creative process and the extent to which building peace is both an art and a skill. He

in Peacemaking in the twenty-first century
Andrew Williams

: ‘while there is much in their MUP/Williams/ch3 98 23/10/98, 11:33 am 99 The planning of an American NWO conduct we do not like, yet it has the cardinal virtue of being creative’. If anything, he wished the Republicans to be seen as more creative than the Democrats, more willing to think the unthinkable, not to ‘primarily be interested in restoring things as they were and then maintaining them as they are’. What he wanted was ‘to make our keynote the righteous and creative faith, first of the individual and then of the nation’.80 Dulles was made Republican

in Failed imagination?
Kader Asmal

’. Standing on one’s head may not be very creative and one’s political opponents may consider that this is the exercise one is permanently engaged in but it does provide a somewhat different perspective, not necessarily an upside down one. If standing on one’s head is perverse, it is the perversity of enthusiasm that gladly made me accept the John Hume invitation, for a number of reasons. First, John Hume has been the peacemaker par excellence for the forty years I have known him. Over the past decade, we in South Africa have followed his attempts to bring together the

in Peacemaking in the twenty-first century
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An act of queering citizenship
Zalfa Feghali

the consolidation of identity and regroupment while supporting more effective efforts for inclusion in the larger society’.40 In this model, dissident citizenship ‘encompasses the often creative oppositional practices of citizens who, either by choice or (much more commonly) by forced exclusion from the institutionalized means of opposition, contest current arrangements of power from the margins of the polity’.41 Crossing borders and queering citizenship shows how reading can be one of these creative oppositional practices. Reading and the civic subject To map how

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship
Dermot Ahern

_Hume_Peacemaking.indd 163 11/10/2013 15:25 164 Dermot Ahern Tackling those challenges will require a new partnership between the new Northern Ireland Executive and the Irish government. I want to reflect tonight on three important issues for that collective agenda. The first is building prosperity. North–South cooperation has already delivered tangible benefits to all parts of this island. It has enabled creative and innovative all-island thinking in many diverse policy areas. Revitalising border communities and harnessing synergies in energy and transport are just some examples. We

in Peacemaking in the twenty-first century
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Why queer(y) citizenship?
Zalfa Feghali

dismantling of borders –​physical or figurative, political or socially constructed, geographical or psychic –​gestures towards a citizenship that is founded on principles vastly different than those we might recognise today. Anzaldúa, Allison, Scofield, Gómez-​Peña, Moure, Díaz, and Martel may represent only a few ‘ways’ of being ‘peripheral’, but their readerly solutions to the problem of civic exclusion are applicable beyond one particular minority group, and are elegant, creative, and transformative. Notes 1 Thomas King, ‘Borders’, in One Good Story, That One

in Crossing borders and queering citizenship