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A clinical archive, 1938
Michal Shapira

Winnicott were early followers of Klein, but they grew more independent of her ideas; however, during the time of the debates, Winnicott was still considered a Kleinian. These bitter theoretical debates in the BPAS eventually concluded with a creative solution that secured the existence of the Society with all its different theoretical threads. In 1944, a revised training scheme was created to now offer two parallel training courses for candidates who supported Klein (A group) and those who supported Anna Freud (B group). Those who did not strictly follow the theories of

in The Munich Crisis, politics and the people
Kelly-Kate Pease

Secretary Timothy Geitner to China, Chinese human rights activist Chen Guangcheng fled house arrest and sought refuge at the US embassy in Beijing. Creative diplomatic solutions to such incidents must be sought. In the case of Assange, a solution has eluded diplomats as he remains at the embassy because the UK is unwilling to allow him passage to Ecuador. Guangcheng was not granted asylum but a backroom deal was struck where China granted him a visa to study in the United States. These cases created awkward situations for the countries involved, and while human rights

in Human rights and humanitarian diplomacy
Abstract only
Kelly-Kate Pease

Money was also able to engage the community concerned in ways that we could not. They have nurtured solid and productive relationships with the community and community leaders and continue to engage them in empowerment and awareness-raising exercises in ways that have benefited the community and creative a positive environment for humanitarian activities once they started. In all these regards, the more traditional humanitarian diplomacy activities were significantly reinforced and then amplified. It’s also worth noting that not only was the civil society

in Human rights and humanitarian diplomacy
Abstract only
Stacey Gutkowski

’ project in so far as their work sought to challenge the authority of the rabbinical establishment, including in exegesis. Maskilim emphasized the synthesis between the creative autonomy of the individual Romantic intellectual and ‘the divine blessedness that reposed in Jewish learning’, seeing the possibility for ‘a merger between the universal expansion of human knowledge and the providential course of Jewish history’. 18 For the avoidance of doubt, my use of the term ‘neo-Romantic’ is an analytical engagement with Asad’s arguments about secular formations. I think

in Religion, war and Israel’s secular millennials
Abstract only
Allyn Fives

). So, what type of freedom is possible in modern life for the romantic? It is the freedom that goes with an ‘ethic for isolated individuals’, which contrasts ‘authentic selfhood’ with the conformism of modern mass society (Shklar 1957 , pp. 134–5, 136). Shklar finds the same romantic orientation in Henri Bergson's work, where freedom is conceptualised as ‘creativity’. As she says in ‘Bergson and the Politics of Intuition’, his account of homo faber entails that ‘if we are to be creative […] we must not be explained away as the effects of either society or biology

in Judith Shklar and the liberalism of fear
Abstract only
Stacey Gutkowski

campaigns via Jewishness. I asked: Q: How do secular soldiers explain the difficult wars in Gaza to themselves? A: Obviously the religious answers. Q: Is it obvious? A: Of course! People aren’t creative. They don’t use their critical way of thinking and it’s the easy answer. Israeli nationalism is religious compared to other national movements, in Europe especially. So, most of the time there is confusion and that is in the interests of religious people. There is an overlap between the two, so the religious answers also work for secular people because of this

in Religion, war and Israel’s secular millennials
Conservative primary socialization
Andy Smith

short, it is envisaged as a more creative process, constantly generating compromises between the taught and the learnt (Weber, Mead). Given that the subject matter of this chapter is less the description of socialization as a process and more what steers it societally, structuralist elements from institutionalist and field theories will play an important role in the interpretation of research results that follow. Nevertheless, because of the importance I give to political work, together with the distinctly plural character of contemporary French society ( Beaud, 2018

in Made in France
Abstract only
Allyn Fives

their foundations (Shklar 1998 [1972] , p. 146]). She sees Rousseau as following in the tradition of Hesiod, for whom ‘fear is the only restraint effective among’ us (Shklar 1998 [1972] , p. 139); and therefore also in the same tradition as Machiavelli, whose ‘countermyth […] has revolution and the repetition of the creative bloodbath as its object’ (Shklar 1998 [1972] , p. 140). Nonetheless, she does not, at this time, accept that fear, cruelty, and violence are the first considerations in political thought

in Judith Shklar and the liberalism of fear
Will Hutton

representing the Crown in the counties (all of which are Conservative) – are their hidden supporters. Marquand has been saying this with mounting force and conviction since the 1980s. His great book – The Unprincipled Society – laid the intellectual foundations, along with Axel Leijunhufvud’s Keynesian Economics and the Economics of Keynes, of my own, The State We’re In. Marquand’s account of Britain’s tragic failure in the 1960s and 1970s to use the state creatively to reform industrial relations, or make partnerships between state, business and the union movement work in

in Making social democrats
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

. Likewise, we believe these themes deserve more investigation in the service of peacebuilding, so we aim to begin that journey in this chapter. To date, practitioner self-care is underexplored in Peace and Conflict Studies, even though peacebuilders themselves could benefit immensely from further enquiry in this area, which could in turn strengthen the depth and quality of their work as facilitators for peace. Indeed, the research for this book has suggested that, through dance and creative movement, participants had an opportunity to experience themselves in a way that

in Dancing through the dissonance