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Joseph Hardwick

of long-running Methodist engagement in Maritime Canada. 29 The next generation of Canadian Methodists also demonstrated their loyalty and Britishness through days of fasting and thanksgiving. From the late 1820s British Methodists depicted their Canadian counterparts as disloyal American republicans who violently opposed both the colonial government and established Anglicanism. 30 According to a recent account, Canadian Methodists responded by cultivating an identity as ‘New World Britons’. The Christian

in Prayer, providence and empire
Joseph Hardwick

Aboriginal peoples. All these forms of engagement illustrate, however, the limitations of Aboriginal involvement in the religious dimensions of royal celebration: participation was most evident in secular forms of royal celebration and personal occasions such as royal birthdays and jubilees. And it was Queen Victoria, and not her male successors, who received special regard. There is little evidence that Aboriginal peoples responded to proclamations and calls to prayer on royal occasions. The exception was those observances that took

in Prayer, providence and empire
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Carmen M. Mangion

world. The standard association between religion and hierarchical religious institutions is also problematic as it ignores an entire facet of religious engagement which is not tied to an institutional structure. Another issue is that women are frequently seen as oppressed by religious institutions; for some historians, their lives have come to represent another unwelcome symbol of patriarchy. In looking at the beliefs and lives of women religious in the nineteenth-century context, a less static interpretation will be suggested. This study of women and religion will

in Contested identities
Stephen Penn

For the student at any university in late medieval Europe, logic and metaphysics were the necessary preliminaries to any serious engagement with theological questions. Wyclif’s distinctive and controversial theological system relied upon an equally distinctive and impressively intricate philosophical system. His three logical treatises and his Summa de Ente (a modern title) are only now beginning to receive the attention they deserve from scholars, but only one of them ( On Universals ) is available in English translation. I have here

in John Wyclif
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David Geiringer

experience are intertwined. It is therefore, equally at risk of overlooking aspects of ‘personal’ Catholic religiosity. ‘Discursive Christianity’ also has a distinctly post-war flavour to it. Brown points out that his focus on discourse has been produced by his engagement with the ‘linguistic turn’, an intellectual movement which is generally seen to be located in the deconstructionism

in The Pope and the pill
Joseph Hardwick

American-born Loyalists and Methodists observed fasts and thanksgivings in Upper Canada and New Brunswick in the Napoleonic era. German-born inhabitants of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, observed fasts and thanksgivings during the Crimean War and Indian ‘Mutiny’. 137 Newspapers for later periods give fuller accounts of public engagement. An editor at Oudtshoorn, Cape Colony, reported ‘exceptionally large’ congregations for a day of humiliation called during a rinderpest epizootic in 1896. On the same day, services at Worcester, a town

in Prayer, providence and empire
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Changing ministries
Carmen Mangion

documents coming out of the Second Vatican Council. 2 She became acquainted here with a new way to ‘be Church’ and began the journey that propelled her into a world of social justice; grounded in the local, but influenced by the global. She ‘plunged into fresh new experiences’ that encouraged a globalised politicisation: teaching on liberation theology and world development issues; witnessing student demonstrations and debates on race relations. During her twelve years in Liverpool her engagement with justice issues was local, ecumenical and national; she served on the

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
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Carmen Mangion

, with Hugh McLeod countering that any rejection of Christianity occurred before the women’s movement. 8 Historian Sarah Browne concluded from her interviews with ‘second-wave’ feminists that the Women’s Liberation Movement in Scotland was informed by religious discourse. She has also linked women’s Catholicism with their feminism, identifying feminists who credited their convent education as an impetus for their engagement with feminism. 9 Neil Armstrong’s research on clergymen’s wives in the 1960s, to take another example of this reassessment, attributes their use

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
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Carmen Mangion

throughout each chapter was the interrelationship and engagement of religion with the post-war secular age. This post-secular analysis has deliberately engaged with religion as a category of analysis emphasising change rather than decline. 65 This work could easily have centred on decline, as many of the scholars of religion charting secularisation do. 66 The diminishment in numbers of women religious was a significant change. Former sister and American sociologist Helen Rose Fuchs Ebaugh in her analysis of decline predicted that ‘the demise [of religious life] is

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
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Cara Delay

-century popularity of the dismal childhood memoir. ‘[I]t is strongly tempting to conclude from an engagement with these texts’, he writes, ‘that the greatest blot on twentieth-century Irish society’s copybook was its treatment of children’.13 Ferriter posits that depictions of bleak childhoods must be taken as more historically accurate than depictions of rural childhood innocence, because memoirs of traumatic childhoods reveal moments of happiness, while depictions of the idyllic childhood recognise no ‘darkness at all’.14 In her writings about her childhood experiences with nuns

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950