Search results

Katy Hayward

of the Irish population, he assumes that the Gaelic culture of Ireland has survived, and outlasted, repeated attempts at colonisation. The notion that Ireland is ‘Gaelic’ is reiterated frequently in Irish nationalism, from the call by republican nationalists for a ‘Free and Gaelic Ireland’ (de Valera, 1922: 14) to the proposition that nationalist principles are inherited from ‘the Gaelic past’ (Haughey, 7 January 1982). However, Ireland is just as frequently referred to as ‘Celtic’. Indeed, the two are generally used as interchangeable signifiers in Irish official

in Irish nationalism and European integration
Katy Hayward

of the traditional conception of citizenship with that of more recent interpretations brings to light a process of change in Irish official nationalism. In traditional republican discourse, statehood essentially facilitated vital international recognition of the nation; it was vital because, as de Valera (1918: 2) conceded, ‘unfortunately it is not the peoples, but their governments, that count’. Citizenship, according to this discourse, was based on membership of the nation, ‘a Free and Gaelic Ireland’, rather than the jurisdiction of the state (de Valera, 1922

in Irish nationalism and European integration