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Writing for the stage in Restoration Dublin
Stephen Austin Kelly

therefore forgive his and others’ past 22 The term ‘Mere Irish’ was not, as it is sometimes supposed, a pejorative term. ‘Mere’ in this context means ‘pure-blooded’ or ‘whole’ and was used to distinguish the Gaelic Irish from the English-Irish or Old English. The dismissive connotation of ‘mere’ in the contemporary sense (as in, for example, the phrase ‘a mere child’) did not exist in the early modern period. 23 John Kerrigan, ‘Boyle’s Ireland and the British problem, 1641–1679’, in David J. Baker and Willy Maley (eds), British identities and English Renaissance

in Dublin
Raymond Gillespie

Stouthamer-Loeber, ‘Books owned by members of Old English and Gaelic Irish families in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries’, in Michael Potterton and Thomas Herron (eds), Dublin and the Pale in the Renaissance, c.1540–1640 (Dublin, 2011), pp. 286–8. 36 Raymond Gillespie, ‘The social thought of Richard Bellings’, in Micheál Ó Siochrú (ed.), Kingdoms in crisis: Ireland in the 1640s (Dublin, 2001), pp. 212–28. See also Coolahan’s chapter in this volume. GRIBBEN 9781526113245 PRINT.indd 47 20/04/2017 15:33 48 Raymond Gillespie fitfully.37 The response to older works

in Dublin
The scholarly achievements of Sir James Ware
Mark Empey

litmus test for reciprocal admiration of ‘opposing’ groups was Ware’s relationship with key figures in Gaelic Ireland. The existence of these important nationwide contacts has already been established, but his association with the distinguished Gaelic scholar Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh from Sligo merits particular attention. After returning to Dublin following the collapse of the Cromwellian regime, Ware immediately immersed himself in Irish sources in an effort to complete various projects which had been interrupted during the Interregnum. 62 Cunningham and Gillespie

in Dublin
Alan Bryson

. after 1566). She perhaps knew him through Thynne, who was a friend and fellow evangelical. St Loe came from the senior gentry of Somerset, was a wealthy and successful soldier, and one of Elizabeth I’s most trusted servants and captain of the guard. About forty at the time, he was well educated, intelligent, charming, active and generous.36 ‘A man of grett hope: whose hardy, painfull, discrett, chargeable, and co[n]tynuall, good service’ was commended by the lord deputy of Ireland, St Loe could be ruthless, as when he defeated Gaelic Irish rebels in late summer 1548

in Bess of Hardwick