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Sanctity as literature
Eva von Contzen

themselves as individual, anchored in personal experience. Jessica Barr argues in Chapter 4 that in this context, writers employ literary strategies that centre around a self-consciously fashioned ‘I’ in order to create textual authority (‘Modelling holiness: self-fashioning and sanctity in late-medieval CONTZEN 9780719089701 PRINT (MAD0059) (G).indd 12 01/12/2014 15:34 Introduction 13 English mystical literature’). The strategies associated with these narrative personae engage with contemporary notions of sanctity. As Barr demonstrates, Richard Rolle, Julian of

in Sanctity as literature in late medieval Britain
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Felicity Dunworth

. Chapter 1 considers the representation of figures such as Noah’s wife, Eve and the Virgin in relation to the typology that is established through their paradigm stories. Religious and literary texts such as the writings of Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe and the poems Piers Plowman and The Romance of the Rose demonstrate the complexity and reflexivity of motherhood in a range of genres that in turn influence dramas such as the later

in Mothers and meaning on the early modern English stage
A tale of two traumas
Brendan Geary

together valued aspects of earlier stages, while being open to truth in other traditions and worldviews. Their faith is suffused with compassion, and they hold structures and symbols more lightly. The same is true of people who move beyond traumatic events. They integrate what remains of value from the past in the light of the traumatic event(s). This can lead to Fowler’s sixth stage, where, to quote Julian of Norwich, ‘All shall be well, and all manner of thing shall be well’. Such ‘Universalizing’ faith is reached by few individuals, but remains the goal to be aimed

in From prosperity to austerity
Laurence Lux-Sterritt

an experience common to all mystics. English Benedictine mystics partook of a long-standing heritage and recounted similar sensations, using images comparable to those of the mystics whose works they read. As indicated by Augustine Baker’s and Gertrude More’s lists of recommended books, Benedictines – at Cambrai at least – were familiar with Gregory of Nyssa, Blosius, Bernard of Clairvaux, Hugh and Rich of St Victor, St Bonaventure, Tauler, Ruysbroeck, Eckart, Suso, the author of the Cloud of Unknowing, Walter Hilton, Julian of Norwich, St John of the Cross, St

in English Benedictine nuns in exile in the seventeenth century
Laurence Lux-Sterritt

emphasise inner prayer. Baker’s teachings were based upon the writings of late medieval mystics whose works he copied and translated for his nuns, including, as we have just seen, the author of the Cloud of Unknowing and Walter Hilton, but also Blosius, Harphius, John Ruysbroeck, Henry Suso or John Tauler.43 The nuns copied Julian of Norwich’s Showings of Love and had knowledge of Julian’s unique brand of immediate female spirituality.44 Baker’s cultural and religious heritage did not endorse the method of the Ignatian exercises, and, rather, sought a prayer of silence

in English Benedictine nuns in exile in the seventeenth century
E.A. Jones

been anxious that a resident solitary could become a nuisance, a distraction or a financial burden [ 6b ]. On the moral and spiritual questions, our sources are generally quieter, though a tempting hypothesis suggests that Julian of Norwich may have prepared the Short Text of her Revelations in connection with such an enquiry into her suitability for the anchoritic life. In some cases the bishop would

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Author: Laura Varnam

The church as sacred space places the reader at the heart of medieval religious life, standing inside the church with the medieval laity in order to ask what the church meant to them and why. It examines the church as a building, idea, and community, and explores the ways in which the sanctity of the church was crucial to its place at the centre of lay devotion and parish life. At a time when the parish church was facing competition for lay attention, and dissenting movements such as Lollardy were challenging the relevance of the material church, the book examines what was at stake in discussions of sanctity and its manifestations. Exploring a range of Middle English literature alongside liturgy, architecture, and material culture, the book explores the ways in which the sanctity of the church was constructed and maintained for the edification of the laity. Drawing on a wide range of contemporary theoretical approaches, the book offers a reading of the church as continually produced and negotiated by the rituals, performances, and practices of its lay communities, who were constantly being asked to attend to its material form, visual decorations, and significance. The meaning of the church was a dominant question in late-medieval religious culture and this book provides an invaluable context for students and academics working on lay religious experience and canonical Middle English texts.

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Calendar time in balade form
Catherine Sanok

work of Richard Rolle, Julian of Norwich, and Margery Kempe, Barr shows us that the mystic’s persona is caught between its historical particularity and its transhistorical, transpersonal status, available to other readers across time and space. Barr brings our attention to the secular, particular, and personal as the domain of feeling in these texts – whether it be Jesus’s sensory apprehensions on the cross or the speaker’s own emotional anguish – and to the transit of this feeling between persons, its availability to the reader as her own feeling. Where Rolle

in Sanctity as literature in late medieval Britain
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Historicism, whither wilt?
Christopher D’Addario

attends rather to a particular place and the intellectual and cultural productions that emanate from its environs. For example, Norwich and its nearby towns in England have been at one time or another the home of Thomas Nashe and Ian McEwan, Julian of Norwich and Kazuo Ishiguro, Thomas Browne and W. G. Sebald. I will turn my attention to the last two in a moment, but let me delay the present for a minute by pausing over the possibility of a study that connects all of the above authors through their geographic proximity, that examines the literary output of a specific

in Texts and readers in the Age of Marvell
E.A. Jones

in the record [ 61 ] she denounced the bishop of Lincoln as Antichrist and scornfully refused to answer the charges against her. Palmer was a contemporary of Julian of Norwich, just as Richard Rolle was a contemporary of the charismatic Yorkshire preacher Henry Staunton [ 59 ]. It is easy to think of the heretic and the mystic as opposites, but these examples suggest that it may also be worth considering what they might have in common

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550