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Revolutionary Prophet of African Unity
Clinton Hutton

“How good and how pleasant it would be before God and man To see the unification of all Africans.” 1 – B OB M ARLEY B OB M ARLEY’S MUSIC REPRESENTS an impressive catalogue of ideas of the black experience and the framing of a Pan-African order germane to freedom, justice, redemption, sovereignty and development. This body of work is decidedly an instrument for decolonisation. It is rooted in the

in The Pan-African Pantheon
Carol Polsgrove

already be gathered, but conditions in London were dire, too, and a colour bar there would make accommodation and dining difficult for those attending. At the last minute, the Fifth Pan-African Congress was relocated in the industrial city of Manchester, where Ras Makonnen could provide food at his restaurants and accommodation in the homes of his friends. 2 Considering the challenges of the hour, the

in Ending British rule in Africa
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“The Father of Pan-Africanism”?
Aldon D. Morris

N UMEROUS SCHOLARS AND POLITICAL ACTIVISTS view William Edward Burghardt Du Bois as the “father of Pan-Africanism”. Du Bois was clearly one of the premier architects of the Pan-African perspective and the historic Pan-African movements. This claim can be sustained by analysing him as a path-breaking scholar and prodigious activist of the twentieth century. When placed within this context, it becomes undeniable that Du Bois was a pioneer of Pan-Africanism. An African American born in 1868, just three

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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The Pan-African Philosopher-King
Adekeye Adebajo

the ideas of Aimé Césaire, Léopold Senghor (see Irele in this volume), W.E.B. Du Bois (see Morris in this volume) and Frantz Fanon (see Rabaka in this volume). He also greatly admired the African-American civil rights leader and Nobel laureate Martin Luther King Jr. His master’s thesis focused on industrialisation in West Africa, and his studies helped develop a Pan-African awareness alongside a deepening of interest in the Western intellectual canon. It was at Sussex that Mbeki further engaged his passion for Shakespeare and W.B. Yeats, discovered the German

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Pan-African Crusader for Social Justice
Lee A. Daniels

black pride through praising black Americans’ rootedness in, and contemporary connection to, Africa and to people of African descent wherever they lived across the globe. Malcolm’s promotion of the idea of Pan-Africanism – the notion that the common genealogical root of people of African descent provided a commonality of purpose in fighting white oppression – struck a resonant chord among many black Americans 7 at that historic moment when the non-violent, “mass action” phase of the US civil rights movement was sweeping across the American landscape, and black

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Pan-African Revolutionary
Maureen Isaacson

“There’s Ruth First, a white woman whose name is not evoked nearly enough.” – A NGELA D AVIS 1 T HIS ESSAY FOCUSES ON R UTH F IRST’S commitment to Pan-African activism. The first section broadly introduces the South African journalist, writer, scholar and activist, setting out the defining themes of her life’s work as a revolutionary and her “courage of principle”. 2 As a Pan-Africanist in her

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Carol Polsgrove

‘When I started I did not know quite the line of approach’, Padmore wrote to Richard Wright in July 1954 about the book he meant to call ‘Black Zionism, Pan-Africanism and Communism’, ‘but it developed as I went along’. Countering Cold War allegations that African independence movements were communist-inspired, he hoped ‘to give a coherent picture of the ideals and

in Ending British rule in Africa
Pan-African Pioneer
Gilbert M. Khadiagala

Benyamin Neuberger shows that, in the twenty-first century, Edward Wilmot Blyden remains one of the powerhouses of Pan-Africanism due to his unique and historical contributions to ideas around African unity, identity, dignity, sovereignty and prosperity. Blyden had a profound influence on the makers of modern Pan-Africanism; current generations unfamiliar with his ideas, therefore, need to revisit his perceptive reflections on African identity, self-determination, Africa’s umbilical links with the diaspora and the meaning of territorial nationalism in colonial West

in The Pan-African Pantheon
The Pan-African Conference of 1900
Jonathan Schneer

London in 1900 was the imperial metropolis sans pareil, the permanent or temporary home to hundreds of thousands who traced their ancestry to the imperialised territories, the jumping-off place for countless thousands who wished to make a new life abroad, the centre of a government whose decisions influenced the destinies of 400 million people around the globe. This chapter on the Pan-African Conference of 1900 will show that London was also a city shaped by anti-imperialists. 1 It situates the Conference, an

in Imperial cities
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Pan-African Politician and Diplomat
W. Andy Knight

had resulted in the uprooting of 15.4 million Africans from the continent and their shipment to other parts of the world between the fifteenth and nineteenth centuries. 7 When the African “slave trade” reached its apogee in the nineteenth century, Pan-Africanism as an ideology and strategy began to take root, particularly in America. 8 Despite having grown up in Jamaica at the height of militant Garveyism, there is little indication that Dudley Thompson fully embraced these militant ideas in his youth. While he was a student at Oxford, Thompson was very much aware

in The Pan-African Pantheon