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The English connection
Paul Fouracre

been taken in the first Continuation of the Chronicle of Fredegar which copied the Liber but cut out the praise for Childebert. 48 The image of weak Merovingians and vigorously powerful Carolingians is further articulated in the Royal Frankish Annals , and then it is given the flesh of historical detail in the Annales Mettenses Priores . The image culminates in the famous opening chapter of Einhard’s Vita

in Frankland
Rachel Stone

inspirational message of heroism, loyalty and love. 26 As Roberta Frank noted, 27 one of the few other examples of a refusal to outlive one’s lord comes from a Carolingian source. The original version of the Royal Frankish Annals for 782 reports a successful battle in the Süntel Mountains. The revised version describes a Frankish defeat, due to a premature and badly planned attack. Although some of the Franks

in Frankland
Paul Fouracre

). Manzano Moreno, E., Épocas medievales , Historia de España 2 (Barcelona: Crítica, 2015). Mayr-Harting, H., The Coming of Christianity to Anglo-Saxon England (London: Batsford, 1972). McKitterick, R., ‘Constructing the past in the early Middle Ages: the case of the Royal Frankish Annals’, Transactions of the Royal Historical Society 6th series 7 (1999), 101–29. Musset, L., The Germanic Invasions: The Making of Europe AD 400–600 , trans. E. James and C. James (London: Elek, 1975). Nelson, J. L., ‘Queens as Jezebels: the careers of

in Debating medieval Europe
The Christian kingdoms and al-Andalus
Charles Insley

. 12 At the very least, it is beyond doubt that in Córdoba three centuries or so of great prosperity and power followed the invasion, the political clout of the city and its rulers made clear in contemporary sources from further afield. According to the Royal Frankish Annals , for instance, a source that we have briefly encountered in Chapter 3 , by Janet Nelson, a diplomatic peace was settled between the Carolingians and the Umayyads around about 812, a sure sign of the grudging respect that existed between the two great powers of ninth-century Europe. 13 Indeed

in Debating medieval Europe