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Jonathan Rayner

pictures, also spans pre-war and post-war American naval films. The creation of this body of films by a contingent of filmmakers with links and affinities to naval services is unsurprising in context, and the naval film’s celebration of tradition is an equally predictable element in scripts produced under wartime conditions, for propagandist ends or by ex-service personnel. Yet the naval war film has re-emerged, alongside other examples of the war genre, as a popular form in American cinema (though not so in British filmmaking) in spite of the disappearance of this

in The naval war film
Stories of nursing, gender, violence and mental illness in British asylums, 1914-30
Vicky Long

, the prime objective appears to have been to protect men’s jobs and pay levels: equally, psychiatrists advocating female nurses were doubtless motivated in part by the attractions of a cheaper labour force, although a desire to improve the low status of psychiatry within the medical 133 Mental health nursing profession at large by refashioning asylums on the template of general hospitals was doubtless also a factor. The NAWU had sought to mobilise the support of ex-servicemen for its campaign. Ex-service personnel would, however, play a more multifaceted role as

in Mental health nursing
Personal and group networks
Angela McCarthy

7 ‘A crony of my own type’: personal and group networks Lorna Carter was born in August 1923 to Englishman Harry Carter and Scotswoman Catherine MacDougall. Lorna was raised in Oban on the west coast of Scotland and in 1941 joined the Wrens. In 1951 she emigrated to New Zealand on board the Atlantis, claiming the complimentary passage that was available to ex-service personnel. Upon arrival she was housed by her mother’s relations and Lorna spent the next three years in New Zealand, writing to her parents usually at least once a week. It is from this voluminous

in Personal narratives of Irish and Scottish migration, 1921–65
Australia and British migration, 1916—1939
Michael Roe

Kingdom established its Oversea Settlement bureaucracy and determined to pay the fares of all ex-service personnel and their families who sought imperial emigration, while the National Relief Fund and the King’s Fund aided others affected by war and desirous of emigrating. By the end of 1922 some 35,000 migrants to Australia had received such aid. Meanwhile the Oversea Settlement Department dispatched to

in Emigrants and empire
Stephen Constantine

attract female domestic servants. An early decision replaced the pre-war cheap reates for domestics with free passages and allowed the lucky recruits £2 each to cover expenses. This generous provision was then made available under the scheme for ex-service personnel and under the Empire Settlement Act. 108 More potentially awkward was the recruiting of other workers. Prewar governments had explicitly

in Emigrants and empire
Vicky Long

cheaper labour force, although a desire to improve the low status of psychiatry within the medical profession at large by refashioning asylums on the template of general hospitals was doubtless also a factor. The Union had sought to mobilise the support of ex-­servicemen for their campaign. Ex-­service personnel would, however, play a more multifaceted role as the story unfolded in the national press. Parallel to the debate over the issue of women nursing on male wards, the Union discussed the allegations of cruelty by attendants made in the journal Truth by a former

in Destigmatising mental illness?
Tommy Dickinson

why the SENs in this book participated in aversion therapy for sexual deviations. Militarisation of nursing Many mental nurses in the early 1940s were called up and assigned to the Royal Army Medical Corps, and many ex-service personnel who had not previously worked in mental health entered mental nursing 166 ‘Subordinate nurses’ after World War II, owing to limited employment opportunities.121 Some nurses’ experiences during the war also had a positive impact on their attitude towards homosexuals and transvestites in their care (discussed in Chapter 4

in ‘Curing queers’
Michael Robinson

's treatment of disabled ex-servicemen. The newly created Ministry of Pensions established legal pension rights and acknowledged accountability for the medical treatment and rehabilitation of disabled veterans. Nowhere is this development better exemplified than in the treatment of psychoneurotic ex-service personnel. Neurasthenic pensioners were in a much more favourable position than mentally ill British Army veterans of the preceding South African War who were, by comparison, regularly denied financial recompense and treated within the highly stigmatised and conservative

in Shell-shocked British Army veterans in Ireland, 1918–39
Tommy Dickinson

military service and assigned to the Royal Army Medical Corps.4 When the war ended many returned to the mental hospitals and numerous ex-service personnel who had not previously worked in mental health were noted to join the profession owing to limited employment opportunities.5 Nolan argues that one of the main attractions of mental nursing to demobilised soldiers was the military-style atmosphere of the hospitals and their excellent sporting facilities.6 Julian Wills was called up for military service during the war, and after demobilisation went on to train as a

in ‘Curing queers’
Abstract only
Robert F. Dewey, Jr.

‘partly to the campaign of the Beaverbrook newspapers; partly to the anti-Common Market group and partly to the opposition of prominent people (e.g. Lord Attlee, Field Marshal Montgomery, Sir Arthur Bryant, etc.)’. 312 Area Agents detailed public reaction to the anti-Marketeers’ ‘­emotional’ and ‘sentimental’ messages on sovereignty and Empire. Among the older generation, trade unionists and ex-service personnel in particular, the propaganda resonated with latent fears of ‘others’. In September, for instance, the deputy Central Office Agent for Yorkshire reported that

in British national identity and opposition to membership of Europe, 1961–63