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Michael Goodrum and Philip Smith

key feature of mid-twentieth century horror. Horror cinema One company to capitalise on the horror craze, in a large part through high-profile girl victims, was Hammer Horror. The British studio had first launched in the 1930s and turned to horror from the mid-1950s onward. They became one of the premier creators of low-budget, but widely consumed, horror films. While the Gothic, unlike other forms of horror, was otherwise marginalized and mined for parody, Hammer Horror kept the sub-genre alive with violent Gothic titles such as The Curse of Frankenstein (1957

in Printing terror
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Traumatic events and international horror cinema
Linnie Blake

Introduction: traumatic events and international horror cinema In a catastrophic age … trauma itself may provide the very link between cultures: not as a simple understanding of the pasts of others but rather, within the traumas of contemporary history, as our ability to listen through the departures we have all taken from ourselves.1 Horror is everywhere the same.2 Since the late 1970s psychoanalytically informed and often Holocaust-focused academics have brought into being an interdisciplinary area within the Humanities known as Trauma Studies. Broadly

in The wounds of nations
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Encountering the monstrous in American cinema
Susan J. Tyburski

questions: How have traditional Gothic tropes been transformed to explore ecological fears in recent apocalyptic films? And what can we learn about our relationship with the natural world by exploring these modern apocalyptic narratives? The recent crop of apocalyptic films reflects a growing trend in ‘eco-horrorcinema: the transformation of our natural home into a destructive

in Ecogothic
Generic hybridity and gender crisis in British horror of the new millennium
Linnie Blake

6 Zombies, dog men and dragons: generic hybridity and gender crisis in British horror of the new millennium Horror thrives best when emotions are bottled up and nobody bottles them up quite like us.1 For over twenty years British horror cinema has been characterised by a will to generic hybridity, as earlier film texts and genres are endlessly worked and re-worked as a means of exploring the traumatic legacy that Thatcherite machismo bequeathed to those who grew either to hyper-masculine empowerment or economic and political emasculation in its shadow. Standing

in The wounds of nations
Jörg Buttgereit’s Nekromantiks
Linnie Blake

which Nekromantik was released in West Germany was an extremely conservative one. And as in Britain (see Chapter 6) this impacted directly on contemporary horror cinema. All horror films shown, both on video and in picture houses were heavily cut, with numerous classics of the genre, such as The 30 German and Japanese horror Evil Dead (1982) and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974) being banned outright on video. Refusing to submit Nekromantik to the agency responsible for implementing the code of Freiwillige Selbst Kontrolle, or ‘voluntary self-control’ under which

in The wounds of nations
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A history of female werewolves
Hannah Priest

Chapter 10 explores presentations of body-centred violence in film, drawing parallels between female werewolves and other violent females in horror cinema, and Barbara Creed in Chapter 11 examines cinematic representations of the femme animale with an exploration of how this conceptualisation of the feminine might inform a reading of Ginger Snaps. Other chapters in the

in She-wolf
Post-war national identity and the spirit of subaltern vengeance in Ringu and The Ring
Linnie Blake

seen in the case of post-war Germany, nonetheless remain gravely wounded by the events of the historic past.3 As this chapter will argue, the capacity of onryou-style narratives to undertake such culturally grounded explorations of national trauma is a product of the genre’s history in Japan, specifically its implicit opposition to the right-wing militarism that led to the Pacific War. For since the 1960s, Japanese horror cinema has repeatedly had the female corpse return from the dead to demand retribution for the hitherto concealed wounds inflicted on the nation by

in The wounds of nations
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Fred Botting

terror, most evident in contemporary culture in the screams that attend a showing of a horror movie. The development of computer games owes debts to horror cinema and incorporates some of its features and, even, some images, in game design. Silent Hill (1999), for example, is a horror game which involves ‘tense wanderings in dark environments’ that are ‘interrupted with shocks, sudden appearances of

in Limits of horror

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is one of the most popular novels in western literature. It has been adapted and re-assembled in countless forms, from Hammer Horror films to young-adult books and bandes dessinées. Beginning with the idea of the ‘Frankenstein Complex’, this edited collection provides a series of creative readings that explore the elaborate intertextual networks that make up the novel’s remarkable afterlife. It broadens the scope of research on Frankenstein while deepening our understanding of a text that, 200 years after its original publication, continues to intrigue and terrify us in new and unexpected ways.

The dollars are coming!

While post-war popular cinema has traditionally been excluded from accounts of national cinemas, the last fifteen years have seen the academy’s gradual rediscovery of cult and, more, generally, popular films. Why, many years after their release, do we now deem these films worthy of study? The book situates ‘low’ film genres in their economic and culturally specific contexts (a period of unstable ‘economic miracles’ in different countries and regions) and explores the interconnections between those contexts, the immediate industrial-financial interests sustaining the films, and the films’ aesthetics. It argues that the visibility (or not) of popular genres in a nation’s account of its cinema is an indirect but demonstrable effect of the centrality (or not) of a particular kind of capital in that country’s economy. Through in-depth examination of what may at first appear as different cycles in film production and history – the Italian giallo, the Mexican horror film and Hindi horror cinema – Capital and popular cinema lays the foundations of a comparative approach to film; one capable of accounting for the whole of a national film industry’s production (‘popular’ and ‘canonic’) and applicable to the study of film genres globally.