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An introduction
Richard J. Hand and Jay McRoy

why horror film narratives remain a consistently successful source for adaptations, be they generic or thematic, in horror cinema, one need consider horror’s relation to the broad concept of myth . In his seminal study In Frankenstein’s Shadow: Myth, Monstrosity, and Nineteenth-Century Writing , Chris Baldick makes use of the concept of ‘myth’ à la Claude Lévi

in Monstrous adaptations
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Russ Hunter

experts in horror cinema. What would he be like? Would he pick apart every argument I’d tried to make? Would I end up running from the exam with my academic tail between my legs? I phoned a friend, who had recently had his PhD examined by Peter, to see what he was like. I needn’t have worried. When my viva finally arrived, I found Peter to be astute and searching in his line of questioning, but keenly interested to talk about my work because discussions about horror cinema genuinely interested him. He was

in Hammer and beyond
Michael Goodrum and Philip Smith

key feature of mid-twentieth century horror. Horror cinema One company to capitalise on the horror craze, in a large part through high-profile girl victims, was Hammer Horror. The British studio had first launched in the 1930s and turned to horror from the mid-1950s onward. They became one of the premier creators of low-budget, but widely consumed, horror films. While the Gothic, unlike other forms of horror, was otherwise marginalized and mined for parody, Hammer Horror kept the sub-genre alive with violent Gothic titles such as The Curse of Frankenstein (1957

in Printing terror
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Traumatic events and international horror cinema
Linnie Blake

Introduction: traumatic events and international horror cinema In a catastrophic age … trauma itself may provide the very link between cultures: not as a simple understanding of the pasts of others but rather, within the traumas of contemporary history, as our ability to listen through the departures we have all taken from ourselves.1 Horror is everywhere the same.2 Since the late 1970s psychoanalytically informed and often Holocaust-focused academics have brought into being an interdisciplinary area within the Humanities known as Trauma Studies. Broadly

in The wounds of nations
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From Dead of Night to The Quatermass Experiment
Peter Hutchings

which perverse sexuality – in the form of the Glueman, an apparently deranged magistrate who pours glue into the hair of various women – was seen as an integral part of rural life. 6 It is clear then that, while not without its precursors, Ealing Studios’ Dead of Night (Alberto Cavalcanti, Charles Crichton, Basil Dearden, Robert Hamer, 1945) is the first important recognisably British horror film. However, to view Dead of Night as marking the ‘birth’ of British horror cinema is rather problematic

in Hammer and beyond
Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend and Hammer’s The Night Creatures
Peter Hutchings

Originally published in Dan North (ed.), Sights Unseen: Unfinished British Films (Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2008), 53–69. I Am Legend : on (and off) screen ‘Begone! Van Helsing and Mina and Jonathan and blood-eyed Count and all.’ ( The Night Creatures ) The story of the relation between the vampire novel I Am Legend (1954) and horror cinema is, to put it mildly, convoluted. It begins in

in Hammer and beyond
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Encountering the monstrous in American cinema
Susan J. Tyburski

questions: How have traditional Gothic tropes been transformed to explore ecological fears in recent apocalyptic films? And what can we learn about our relationship with the natural world by exploring these modern apocalyptic narratives? The recent crop of apocalyptic films reflects a growing trend in ‘eco-horrorcinema: the transformation of our natural home into a destructive

in Ecogothic
Generic hybridity and gender crisis in British horror of the new millennium
Linnie Blake

6 Zombies, dog men and dragons: generic hybridity and gender crisis in British horror of the new millennium Horror thrives best when emotions are bottled up and nobody bottles them up quite like us.1 For over twenty years British horror cinema has been characterised by a will to generic hybridity, as earlier film texts and genres are endlessly worked and re-worked as a means of exploring the traumatic legacy that Thatcherite machismo bequeathed to those who grew either to hyper-masculine empowerment or economic and political emasculation in its shadow. Standing

in The wounds of nations
Jörg Buttgereit’s Nekromantiks
Linnie Blake

which Nekromantik was released in West Germany was an extremely conservative one. And as in Britain (see Chapter 6) this impacted directly on contemporary horror cinema. All horror films shown, both on video and in picture houses were heavily cut, with numerous classics of the genre, such as The 30 German and Japanese horror Evil Dead (1982) and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974) being banned outright on video. Refusing to submit Nekromantik to the agency responsible for implementing the code of Freiwillige Selbst Kontrolle, or ‘voluntary self-control’ under which

in The wounds of nations
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A history of female werewolves
Hannah Priest

Chapter 10 explores presentations of body-centred violence in film, drawing parallels between female werewolves and other violent females in horror cinema, and Barbara Creed in Chapter 11 examines cinematic representations of the femme animale with an exploration of how this conceptualisation of the feminine might inform a reading of Ginger Snaps. Other chapters in the

in She-wolf