Search results

Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

declared that ‘whatsoever King may reign, I'll be the Vicar of Bray, Sir,’ fitted his theology and his liturgy to the ruling orthodoxy as determined by the monarch as lay governor of the Church of England. But another view is possible, that he was not a man without any identity, whose character at any one moment was a simple cover for or reflex of some objective material character. On the one hand, his principal identity was as the Vicar of Bray. On the other, the far from merely reflective or superficial or epiphenomenal significance of religious practice is confirmed

in Cultivating political and public identity
Open Access (free)
Association and distinction in politics and religion
Rodney Barker

religious practices of its members, whilst leaving their economic activities largely unattended, and their political ones non-existent in times of stability. Elizabeth I of England, who said that she did not wish to make windows into men's souls, was perhaps departing less radically from previous practice than appears. She insisted on public conformity to a prayer book and a liturgy that were imposed on all by secular law. What mattered was conformist behaviour. The terms ‘mobilised’ and ‘unmobilised’ have only a limited usefulness, since they refer

in Cultivating political and public identity
Karin Fischer

catechetical dimension and directly relates religious education to faith formation as an important part of the teacher’s work. The Catholic Preschool and Primary Religious Education Curriculum has four interrelated strands, ‘Christian Faith, Word of God, Liturgy and Prayer, and Christian Morality.’73 Judging by the continued insistence on sacramental preparation and by the fact that schools are still asked to ‘facilitate children who wish to “opt out” of faith formation’,74 this move appears to represent a limited acknowledgement of the existence of non-Catholic children in

in Schools and the politics of religion and diversity in the Republic of Ireland
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

constituting phenomenon of human life, on which everything else depends, and at an only slightly less generalised level of argument, language can be presented as the fundamental constituting activity for human identity. 35 Its role is dramatically illustrated when collective identities are being challenged or asserted. The assertion of the role of Latin in the Catholic liturgy by the Council of Trent in the sixteenth century was as defining for the church's identity as was the shift to the vernacular by the Second Vatican Council in the twentieth. 36 Secular identity as

in Cultivating political and public identity
Abstract only
D. A. J. MacPherson

England’.105 Religion continued to be a motivating issue of some force for Orangewomen well into the interwar period. Controversy over the introduction of a new Anglican Prayer Book focused female Orange minds during the late 1920s. The Church of England was riven by debate in 1927 and 1928 about a new liturgy that aimed to incorporate some elements of Anglo-Catholic ritual.106 As we have seen above, such sentiments were inflammatory to Orange anti-Ritualist sensibilities. Figure 1.1 illustrates how this period was the high-water mark of female Orange activism, with

in Women and the Orange Order
Lewis H. Mates

Methodism had emerged from Wesleyan Methodism in the early 1800s as an attempt to revert to an ‘original’, pure form of Wesley’s teachings, rejecting the influence of Anglicanism by re-asserting simplicity in buildings and liturgy, emphasising the role of the laity and, fundamentally, stressing the political implications of the Methodist creed promoting a focus on the working class and the poor. After his conversion, Wilson soon became a union Structures, agents and the ILP’s high tide 51 activist and began rising through the ranks of DMA agents (full-time officials

in The Great Labour Unrest