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Bryan Fanning

Benson’s imaginary future changes dramatically. It becomes one in which Catholic social and political thought has been implemented worldwide, where the great political economists of the day consult cardinals and where Ireland has been turned into the contemplative monastery of Europe. At the beginning of the twentieth century Catholic thinkers were preoccupied with the threats that secular, liberal and social ideals presented to religiosity. In his 1907 novel Lord of the World, Benson had imagined a future world dominated since 1917 by socialism, freemasonry and

in Irish adventures in nation-building
Bryan Fanning

had no influence in society and priests had no relevance. In the remainder of the book Benson’s imaginary future changes dramatically. It becomes one in which Catholic social and political thought has been implemented worldwide, where the great political economists of the day consult cardinals and where Ireland has been turned into the contemplative monastery of Europe. At the beginning of the twentieth century Catholic thinkers were preoccupied with the threats that secular, liberal and socialist ideals presented to religiosity. In his 1907 novel Lord of the World

in Are the Irish different?
Laura Chrisman

African cultural studies as it already exists outside the academy. It might mean that what South African academics ‘appropriate’ from the UK are not only aspects of its current theoretical capital but also insights inspired by the UK’s social, educational and cultural history.3 I do not want to imply any direct parallel between the history of South Africa and that of the UK in the twentieth century: on the contrary. (Later I will address what I see as the dangers of applying theoretical paradigms developed in the UK, USA and Europe within a new South Africa.) But I do

in Postcolonial contraventions
Peter J. Martin

analysts dissect it, or Cambridge University Press publish Adlington’s book?) These beliefs, in turn, may be seen to be derived from a more general ideology of artistic modernism which legitimates this work and the activities of figures such as Birtwistle. From a sociological perspective, it is this discourse, this framework of legitimation, and the claims and activities it licenses, which are of primary analytical interest, rather than ‘the music’ itself. Cases such as that of Birtwistle’s music, where questions of meaning and interpretation are constantly foregrounded

in Music and the sociological gaze
Open Access (free)
The imperial metropolis of Heart of Darkness
Laura Chrisman

concurrently with the more sensational operations of overseas violence. As Heart of Darkness indicates, within and across metropolitan everyday life, the economic, political and cultural elements of imperialism reproduced themselves in ways that were quiet,complex and apparently unspectacular. I will outline here some of the ways in which late nineteenth-century European imperialism inheres in the textures of daily labour and leisure in Conrad’s novella. I will also suggest that the Company’s structures and agents – including Kurtz – need to be reinterpreted through this

in Postcolonial contraventions
David Lloyd’s work
Laura Chrisman

premises were also, in some regards, different. When (p. 68) Lloyd refers to ‘post-enlightenment liberals such as John Stuart Mill’ and their continuation of Kant’s racial thinking, he suggests that Kant’s centrality to Victorian England is self-evident.6 But Kant’s pan-European influence in conceptions of ‘race’ is a notion that needs further justification. So does Lloyd’s claim for the primacy of cultural theory itself in eighteenth-century conceptualisations of ‘human identity’. This claim does not acknowledge as significant the theorisations produced by political and

in Postcolonial contraventions
Michael G. Cronin

, Edward Said significantly recalibrated the lens through which we now read Yeats. Along with Yeats’s ‘settled presence’, as he called it, in Irish and British culture and in European modernism, the poet also presents ‘another fascinating aspect: that of the indisputably great national poet who during a period of anti-imperialist resist- 4147 Inglis–Are the Irish different_BB_Layout 1 29/07/2014 09:27 Page 245 Irish studies between the past and the future 245 ance articulates the experiences, the aspirations, and the restorative vision of a people suffering under the

in Are the Irish different?
David Hesse

7 Régiments du passé: re-­enactment The previous chapter examined how continental history enthusiasts commemorate moments of Scottish–European contact. While these commemorators seek to uphold or revive a Scottish memory, re-­enactors strive to bring the past back to life in the present. They employ reconstructed period costumes and props to reproduce selected events and characters of the past. They do so for pleasure and sensuous experience, but also with the aim of educating their audiences. ‘Scotland’ has become a proper re-­enactment genre over the past two

in Warrior dreams
Abstract only
Peter Beilharz

whatever else. I was attracted to what was continental in American sociology, and had a strong sense of curiosity about the United States and Europe. So the weeks away each year seemed continuous, even though the cultures and geographies I encountered were diverse. Transatlantic was an interesting canopy, alongside Pacific and Indian Oceans for me. I would fly into LAX from Melbourne, join in the ASA and visit some other cities – always an eye opener, for there was no such thing quite as coherent as ‘America’, and some of its bits were also elsewhere, beyond the borders

in Intimacy in postmodern times
Abstract only
Peter Beilharz

a work in progress. Maybe it was me, always distracted by other things in the storehouse of possibilities of intellectual culture. It was a big toy box. In the case of Bauman, I was attracted to the combination of socialism and culture, and, via the Budapest School, I became more closely convinced of the value of East European critical theory. So I had solicited entries for my Social Theory book on Castoriadis and Heller, but not yet on Bauman. I suppose there is also a possible chance that Bauman’s best was at this point yet to come. Castoriadis had by this

in Intimacy in postmodern times