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James Clifford

silent, building weirs and then, in another season, letting them wash away. Postscript Curatopia’s editors have suggested that I provide an update – for a chapter that is already an unfinished collage. So, I offer a few pages that reflect my recent research – visits and conversations – in Western European museums, 117 118 North America sites that can be called, with appropriate hesitation, ‘post-ethnological’. Of course, comparable institutions in places like Canada, the USA, Aotearoa New Zealand, Australia, or Alaska are more closely engaged with source

in Curatopia
Learning from Māori curatorship pastand present
Conal McCarthy, Arapata Hakiwai, and Philipp Schorch

taonga and the Public Sphere’, 197. This concept has also come under criticism from some scholars, see for example P. Tapsell, ‘Taonga, Marae, Whenua – Negotiating Custodianship: A Maori Tribal Response to Te Papa: The Museum of New Zealand’, in A. Coombes (ed.), Rethinking Settler Colonialism: History and Memory in Australia, Canada, Aotearoa New Zealand and South Africa (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2006), pp. 86–99. 34 Mātauranga Māori Strategy: He Ara Whainga (Wellington: Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, 2004) (adapted from original). 225 226

in Curatopia
Abstract only
An investigation into the connection between veterinary and medical practice in ancient Egypt
Conni Lord

is assumed by the context that the sufferer is a bovine. An interpretation by Professor Peter Windsor (University of Sydney, Australia, personal communication, 2010) suggests that ‘nest of a worm’ could be a literal translation for an external parasite such as Old World screw-worm fly. The third case study is also badly damaged, possibly documenting a case of bovine photosensitisation causing lethargy and severe eye problems (Windsor, personal communication). Unfortunately, because of the damage to the text, it is impossible to interpret the clinical signs or the

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt
Post-connoisseurial dystopia and the profusion of things
Sharon Macdonald and Jennie Morgan

‘Burra Charter’, first developed in 1979 by Australia ICOMOS, to ‘rank’ the ‘significance’ or relative ‘worth’ of individual objects, or whole collections, has been influential in suggesting alternative notions of value. 16 J. Clifford, ‘The Others: Beyond the “Salvage” Paradigm’, Third Text, 3:6 (1989), 73–8. 17 S. Macdonald, ‘Musealisation: Everyday Life, Temporality and Old Things’, in S. Macdonald, Memorylands: Heritage and Identity in Europe Today (London: Routledge, 2013), ch. 6. 18 See S. Macdonald, ‘Collecting Practices’, in S. Macdonald (ed.), A Companion

in Curatopia
Foe, facilitator, friend or forsaken?
Bryony Onciul

future relations. The value of museums lies, at least in part, in their ability to provide Community engagement, Indigenous heritage space for dialogue, debate, controversy and contestation of challenging topics, but to do this they need highly skilled cultural brokers who can work across platforms, viewpoints and agendas.43 Fiona Cameron’s research in Australia indicates that ‘bringing important challenging and controversial points of view in a democratic, free-thinking society [is] seen as a key role for museums’.44 Addressing global concerns is vital

in Curatopia
Exhibiting pre-Indigenous belonging in Vancouver
Paul Tapsell

December 2016.  2 Ibid.  3 See for example P. Tapsell, Pukaki: A Comet Returns (Auckland: Reed, 2000); P. Tapsell, ‘Taonga, Marae, Whenua – Negotiating Custodianship: A Maori Tribal Response to Te Papa: The Museum of New Zealand’, in A. Coombes (ed.), Rethinking Settler Colonialism: History and Memory in Australia, Canada, Aotearoa New Zealand and South Africa (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2006), pp. 86–99; P. Tapsell, ‘Aroha Mai: Whose Museum? The Rise of Indigenous Ethics in Museum Contexts’, in J. Marstine (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Museum Ethics

in Curatopia
Abstract only
Katherine Fennelly

described the impact of migration and displacement as causing homesickness and nostalgia in the colonial mindset of settlers in nineteenth-century Australia and New Zealand ( 2010 : 44–7). The material legacy of mass migration from rural Ireland to cities like New York is further evidenced in domestic assemblages from the period (Orser 2007 : 79–82). The Wakefield ‘Dublin’ pipe suggests that at least one individual at the Wakefield Asylum maintained an emotional attachment to Ireland, articulated through their purchase of an engraved pipe. One pipe is not enough evidence

in An archaeology of lunacy
Abstract only
Collecting networks and the museum
Samuel J.M.M. Alberti

. Griffiths, Hunters and Collectors: The Antiquarian Imagination in Australia (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996); S. Hall (ed.), Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices (London: Sage, 1997); S. Sheets-Pyenson, Cathedrals of Science: The Development of Colonial Natural History Museums during the Late Nineteenth Century (Kingston, Ontario: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1988); Shelton (ed.), Collectors: Expressions of Self and Other; Shelton (ed.), Collectors: Individuals and Institutions. 116 Nature and culture 21 Greenwood, Museums

in Nature and culture
Abstract only
Katherine Fennelly

be seen as care-driven. Goffman equates asylums with prisons and concentration camps and treats all as ‘total institutions’. Each institution focuses on the physical and mental control of the inmate, though as demonstrated by Tuke’s concern for patient experience, the lunatic asylum and the planning of interior space and environment for these institutions may be said to reflect a certain duty of care to patients. As stated by Australian historian of medicine Dolly MacKinnon, madness cannot be said to be ‘silent’, and the patients’ ‘interior soundscapes’ – the

in An archaeology of lunacy
Abstract only
Artefacts and disciplinary formation
Samuel J.M.M. Alberti

MMCM vol. 1 (2 February 1892); Bennett, Pasts beyond Memory; A. Desmond, Huxley: From Devil’s Disciple to Evolution’s High Priest (London: Penguin, 1998); T. Griffiths, Hunters and Collectors: The Antiquarian Imagination in Australia (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996); T. H. Huxley, Evidence as to Man’s Place in Nature (London: Williams and Norgate, 1863). 15 Bennett, Pasts beyond Memory; Jenkins, Archaeologists and Aesthetes. 16 W. H. Crompton, ‘Jesse Haworth: first president of the Manchester Egyptian Association’, Journal of the Manchester Egyptian and

in Nature and culture