Search results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 40 items for :

  • "Australia" x
  • Archaeology and Heritage x
  • All content x
Clear All
Vilsoni Hereniko

Virtual museums and new directions? Vilsoni Hereniko The word ‘museum’ for me evokes images of cultural objects in glass cases that reflect an era which is dead and gone. This has been my experience visiting most museums in different countries in Oceania. The better-funded museums in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand as well as North America and Europe (including the United Kingdom), on the other hand, appear to be more vibrant and able to attract tourists and residents in larger numbers. The Hawaiian Hall and the Pacific Hall of the Bishop Museum in Honolulu

in Curatopia
An alternative design source
J. Peter Phillips

single blocks of granite transported hundreds of miles from Aswan would have made them very valuable. Six monolithic granite palmiform columns were excavated by Naville in 1891 from the pronaos of Herakleopolis Magna and sent to museums: the British ‘palmiform’ columns 439 Museum (EA 1123), the Manchester Museum (1780), Bolton Museum and Art Gallery (1891.14.1/1891.14.2), the South Australian Museum at Adelaide (inventory number not known), the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (91.259), and the University Museum, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (E636

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt
Catherine J. Frieman

the early American colonists to the complex landscape management and agricultural technologies used by Native North Americans. Bill Gammage ( 2013 ) has made a similar argument for Australia, demonstrating the sophistication of traditional Aboriginal land management prior to colonization and how it shaped the landscape encountered by Europeans. Indeed, Bruce Pascoe ( 2016 ), in an award-winning piece of complex ethnohistory, has argued that Aboriginal Australians did indeed cultivate a wide variety of plant species, but that knowledge of the technologies they used

in An archaeology of innovation
Abstract only
Loomings
Catherine J. Frieman

the early twentieth century, and contexts from the Pacific to Europe to Australia and the Americas. I examine all sides of the innovation process, from why innovations develop and spread, to how innovations are communicated, to why some innovations fail, and why certain groups of people seem particularly predisposed to innovate. In the end, I propose a social model of innovation, applicable not just in studies of the past, but to innovation in the present as well. Since this book is in many ways an excavation of an idea, I have framed it around a quest for knowledge

in An archaeology of innovation
Taking care of difference in museums
Billie Lythberg, Wayne Ngata, and Amiria Salmond

’s former empires, in a sort of pattern of reverse intellectual colonisation, from the so-called settler colonies of Canada, Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia, as well as the USA, back to the former imperial centres. In particular, it seems that national museums in those places – as spaces dedicated to culture – were among the first government institutions to fully implement liberal democratic state-sponsored multiculturalism, beginning in the 1970s and 1980s.10 And if the earliest museums to adopt strongly multiculturalist policies and administrative structures were

in Curatopia
Abstract only
Catherine J. Frieman

play in the production of art in Aboriginal Australian communities. May ( 2008 , 182) describes initiated elders controlling the production of art in a contemporary art-making community in Arnhem Land, Northern Territory by making sure that young men wanting to become artists understood the cultural protocols that govern the ownership of motifs, techniques, and stories by different clans, as well as monitoring their output to ensure they complied with these. Thus, specialization, or achieving what Maikel Kuijpers ( 2018 , 563) refers to as “virtuoso” skill, could

in An archaeology of innovation
Patricia Lambert-Zazulak

UK, Australia, the USA, Chile, Greece, Germany and Canada. The bank also contains some samples from mummies originating in Sudan, South America and the Canary Islands. The tissue bank’s records Occasionally remains cannot be biopsied, as for example in the case of those now located in the American south-west, where there may be an agreement with local tribes that all human remains in museum collections will not be sampled; or where the remains are inaccessible due to thick and tight wrappings. Nevertheless they may still be photographed, X-rayed and recorded, thus

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt
Abstract only
Katherine Fennelly

institutional framework of the asylum in secondary literature. Australian historian Lee-Ann Monk argues, for example, that male keepers in Australian asylums in the Victorian period reinforced masculine gender dominance in the asylum, through the authority inherent in their position and their assertion of patient control through physical action. Thus, keepers asserted their masculinity among other keepers, as well as over the patients (Monk 2003 : 70–1). In the same volume on Australian asylums and madness, Dolly MacKinnon includes the activity of keepers and nurses in the

in An archaeology of lunacy
An epistemology of postcolonial debate
Larissa Förster and Friedrich von Bose

3 Concerning curatorial practice in ethnological museums: an epistemology of postcolonial debates Larissa Förster and Friedrich von Bose Debating ethnological museums in the German-speaking world1 Since the early 2000s, ethnological museums have come under increased scrutiny in the German-speaking world, as elsewhere.2 While in North America, Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand they have had to confront and react to postcolonial critiques for much longer, colonial history has only comparatively recently started to enter public discourse and the politics of

in Curatopia
James Clifford

silent, building weirs and then, in another season, letting them wash away. Postscript Curatopia’s editors have suggested that I provide an update – for a chapter that is already an unfinished collage. So, I offer a few pages that reflect my recent research – visits and conversations – in Western European museums, 117 118 North America sites that can be called, with appropriate hesitation, ‘post-ethnological’. Of course, comparable institutions in places like Canada, the USA, Aotearoa New Zealand, Australia, or Alaska are more closely engaged with source

in Curatopia