Search results

Abstract only
Nicholas Royle

I was finishing a book about Hélène Cixous. There is a time when you’re no longer writing, you’re finishing, it’s the end. But how is it possible, when you regularly wake up, first thing in the morning or middle of the night, with a phrase or image that provides, you believe, a crucial additional portal and you pick up your pen and you’re opening, O pen, another chapter of The Book I Do Not Finish ? Or you go to see, you go to the sea of the screen at your laptop before you’re properly awake, and stumble over some word that throws you overkeyboard anew

in Hélène Cixous
Nicholas Royle

? Are you – nobody too? 4 To awake, Shakespeare of the Night: in that conversation with the donkey called ‘Writing Blind’ Cixous says she nights, she says: ‘There is no more genre . I become a thing with pricked-up ears. Night becomes a verb. I night. I write at night. I write: the Night.’ 5 Derrida doesn’t night like this, and yet his writings on Shakespeare are strikingly concerned with what might be called a night Shakespeare, with the night in which Romeo and Juliet speak and exchange vows, the theatre of the night and the night of the name as he

in Hélène Cixous
Abstract only
In the spirit of the gift of love
Sal Renshaw

-first is to be marked by a similar ‘not speaking’ that is nothing but speaking, of the supposedly unspeakable – religion in the reign of scientific truth. Against this background of tentative observations about the challenges that religious meaning is facing in postmodernity, the French feminist ‘poeticophilosopher’4 Hélène Cixous’ theorisation of a ‘feminine’5 relation to the gift 4 4 Cixous’ work is notoriously difficult to contain within the conventional categories of the academy. It has variously been described as literary theory, literary criticism, poetry, and

in The subject of love
Abstract only
Philosophy, theology, and French feminism
Sal Renshaw

is a presumption to speak meaningfully of lover and beloved, the concept of love is necessarily implicated in concerns about subjectivity. For the feminist thinker Hélène Cixous, the sexual politics of how love has traditionally been understood to negotiate a subject/object relation has been a constant preoccupation of her work, which is informed by, and contributes to, contemporary philosophical reflections on difference and subjectivity. Throughout her writing she explores the ways in which different conceptions of love have been implicated in the production of

in The subject of love
Abstract only
For the love of God
Sal Renshaw

maternal or sacred, about which I will say more later in this chapter, and, to name only example from Hélène Cixous’ work, her perennial return to the trope of Eve, all signal a shared concern with the relationship between 58 A significant debate within feminist theological discourse concerns the referential nature of religious language, and, thus, the issue of ontology. While Ruether’s statement appears to presume a certain ontology of the divine, her work is situated firmly within a tradition that rejects the Enlightenment ideal of correspondence between language and

in The subject of love
Abstract only
On sitting down to read a letter from Freud
Nicholas Royle

father): dreaming is the element most receptive to mourning, to haunting, to the spectrality of all spirits and the return of the ghosts … The dream is also a place that is hospitable to the demand for justice and to the most invincible of messianic hopes. 6 You receive the dream like a letter from the beyond. ‘Dreams await us in a country we can’t get tickets to’, remarks Hélène Cixous. 7 She stresses what so few notice, the might of the future in relation to dreaming. They wait for us, they are up ahead. There is no bus or taxi, no passport or

in Hélène Cixous
Abstract only
Shakespeare’s voyage to Greece
Richard Wilson

,4,237 ]; Othello whether ‘It is impossible’ a monster can be man [ 4,2,138 ]; Antony and Cleopatra whether ‘O Isis, ’tis impossible!’ for love to conquer [ 3,3,15 ]; and Pericles whether we credit ‘points that seem impossible’ [ 21,112 ], what Hélène Cixous says about Derrida comes to look equally applicable to the Elizabethan dramatist: ‘the scenarios of all his travels

in Free Will
Author: Heather Walton

This book generates a critical framework through which to interrogate the way in which religious feminists have employed women's literature in their texts. This is in order that both the way we read literature and the literature we read might be subject to scrutiny, and that new reading practices be developed. Having both the critical and constructive agenda, this is a book in two parts. The first part locates the study of the use of women's writing by religious feminists in a much wider frame than has previously been attempted. In the past individual religious feminists have been criticised, often publicly and loudly, for the use they have made of particular literary texts. Having critically surveyed previously unacknowledged constraints under which religious feminists read women's literature, the second part of the book explores how the work of women poststructuralist thinkers and theorists can enrich the reading practices. It offers alternative models for an engagement between literature and theology. Julia Kristeva is best known within the academy for her unorthodox application of Lacanian theory to contemporary culture. Her work challenges religious feminists to reassess the utilitarian approaches to literary texts and enquire into whether these might have a more powerful political role when their status as literature is recognised and affirmed. The book elucidates Luce Irigaray's thinking on sexual difference and also demonstrates its significance for feminist religious readers.

Abstract only
Heather Walton

the work of Kristeva, Irigaray and Cixous have demonstrated that these women point towards ways in which the traditionally gendered relationship between literature and theology can be reinscribed and re-visioned. From their work we can begin to construct an agenda for feminist religious reading that takes us beyond the conventions that now regulate the uses of literature in feminist theology and into a wilder and more dangerous place. Literature at last For feminist religious reading begins when the dangerous power of literature is recognised and affirmed. We are

in Literature, theology and feminism
Nicky Coutts

Vets have a tendency towards suicide. Or so Hélène Cixous proposes recounting seven vets who took their own lives over just a three-year period in her local area. 1 In notebooks, not originally intended for distribution, she tells the story of how the dark hair of a 35-year-old vet turned to white overnight following the violent suicide of his

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking