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Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

peace[building] process. So, it really is localised to their needs. ‘Claire’, M4P founder, United States Do local actors working outside the Global North experience and perceive the M4P process as localised? And what does it mean to be localised when it comes to peacebuilding programming? In this chapter we investigate what dance and creative movement can tell us about local and/or global approaches to peacebuilding, including how the local and the global

in Dancing through the dissonance
Lesley Pruitt and Erica Rose Jeffrey

in peacebuilding and the ways in which dance and creative movement can play a part in this process. The research conducted for this book suggests that dance can constitute an effective, inclusive pathway to support youth participation in peacebuilding. At the same time, the data gathered across the three case studies highlights the importance of developing approaches that are age specific, gender sensitive, culturally relevant and flexible. Youth, peace and security At least as far back as the beginning of the UN in 1945, the

in Dancing through the dissonance
Abstract only
Michelle Bentley

and ignore the very extensive and highly creative ways in which actors exert agency over the norms and behaviours they engage with, to the extent that they can manipulate and even change them. Critically, this is not merely a drawing on of existing ideas and language, but their deliberate manipulation for the purposes of shaping policy in ways beneficial to an actor. Within this context

in Syria and the chemical weapons taboo
Abstract only
Anca Mihaela Pusca

between the organizations of civil society and political institutions, as well as the assumption that the democratization process can be measured in any way through the “strength” or “weakness” of civil society. Chapter 7 offers a more creative approach to understanding social change through an examination of the role that the visual plays in the formation, maintenance and destruction of collective illusions. Using the case of a group of photographers who see themselves as social anthropologists studying and tracking the Romanian transition through images, the chapter

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment
Stanley R. Sloan

cooperation among European democracies. Wise leaders in the post-war American government recognized that US interests would best be served by helping the Europeans recover from the war and build economic cooperation among them. This recognition inspired the Marshall Plan of economic assistance that has since been recognized as the most generous and creative self-interested program that a victorious nation has ever mounted for devastated allies and enemies alike. On the security side, however, the United States required urging from the Europeans to join them in providing

in Defense of the West (second edition)
Abstract only
Germany in American post-war International Relations
Felix Rösch

Depression and the entry of the US into the two World Wars had challenged their self-understanding. 78 As summed up by Holborn: ‘America was in a state of crisis. Would the German immigration have happened ten years earlier, its intellectual outcome would probably have been marginal … as intellectual questions would not have been of much concern in a prosperous country.’ 79 As a consequence, calibrating between external and existing knowledge, American scholars and émigrés were encouraged to rethink their commonly accepted knowledge, leading to creative meaning

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks
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Politics, violence and resistance
Richard Jackson

the ‘war on terrorism’ prevents clear and creative thinking about alternative strategies and approaches; instead, it institutionalises an approach which has already proved to be counterproductive and damaging to the very institutions and values America and its allies are purportedly trying to protect. There is a genuine risk that the moral absolutism of the discourse induces political amnesia about

in Writing the war on terrorism
Abstract only
Paul Arthur

plant and that leaders have to bring their constituencies with them. But like all political midwives they grow concerned that too much nurturing can lead to a form of infantilism – we can see why Galtung falls back on the psychological. Indeed it is only Dermot Ahern and Maurice Hayes who can begin to properly indulge in the sunny uplands. Following the literature on peace studies it is Dr Hayes who takes the debate to a new level when he invokes so strongly the forgotten art of the creative process and the extent to which building peace is both an art and a skill. He

in Peacemaking in the twenty-first century
Andrew Williams

: ‘while there is much in their MUP/Williams/ch3 98 23/10/98, 11:33 am 99 The planning of an American NWO conduct we do not like, yet it has the cardinal virtue of being creative’. If anything, he wished the Republicans to be seen as more creative than the Democrats, more willing to think the unthinkable, not to ‘primarily be interested in restoring things as they were and then maintaining them as they are’. What he wanted was ‘to make our keynote the righteous and creative faith, first of the individual and then of the nation’.80 Dulles was made Republican

in Failed imagination?
Anca Mihaela Pusca

and Eastern Europe was hoping for a more creative approach to what was to come after the fall of communism, the Bulgarian philosopher Ivailo Ditchev argues that the lack of such a creative approach has had a devastating effect on the spirit of these societies: Looking West for the natural, post-communist countries see nothing. There exists a vast number of means to solve problems of situations but no representation of ends, no idea of the meaning of the whole [. . . ] Post-communist countries today are haunted by the idea that there was nothing symbolic in the

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment