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Anthony Alan Shelton

the two hundred years of Spanish American independence.10 A similarly extensive exhibition programme was mounted by Portugal between 1988 and 2002 but, instead of focusing on the ‘discoveries’ of land and peoples as Spain did, it concentrated on the ‘discovery’ of sea routes, the cultural encounters they engendered and their mutual implications in shaping a new historical period.11 While critical discourse focused on the ideological underpinnings of images of the New World from a European perspective and seldom acknowledged Indigenous agency or counter

in Curatopia
Abstract only
Ian Wedde

extent on memory resources with, inevitably, varying degrees of politicised belief-system affiliations. Inevitably and appropriately, the scenarios cluster around museum work and discourse, both curatorial and academic. As I began to draw together the themes and scenarios of the chapters collected here, I increasingly felt the need to move outside points of view determined and contained to greater or lesser extents by the politics of museum practices and, indeed, by the locations and institutions that conventionally or unconventionally constitute museums. When teaching

in Curatopia
From Samoa with Love? at the Museum Fünf Kontinente, Munich
Hilke Thode-Arora

ethnic shows were concerned (and this is the dominant discourse in academic circles even today), Western sources from the same period suggest that Samoan people were recruited to entertain German audiences and were meant to be impressed by Germany’s military superiority – a perception of a very hierarchical power structure with dominant Western colonial powers on one end and dominated, if not oppressed, Samoans on the other. According to European, Australian and Samoan newspapers of the time, it was the Marquardts who recruited and took ‘their’ Samoans to Germany. The

in Curatopia
Catherine J. Frieman

thriving political movement, technological conservatism is widely reviled, being explicitly problematized in scholarly literature (Moore 1991 , 1995 ) and viciously caricatured in popular media. The face of technological conservatism is old, out of touch, out of date and waving a slipper at those damn kids on his lawn – like Grampa Simpson, he probably also wears an onion on his belt. 1 This disconnect in our discourse between social innovation/conservatism and material or technological innovation/conservatism is one that has served to obfuscate the ways in which

in An archaeology of innovation
Open Access (free)
Melanie Giles

will be situated with the landscape politics of the day: the discourse of ‘improvement’ and contest over peat itself, heralding the slow disappearance of this valuable environment. Yet by considering its hidden wealth – its plant and animal life, its craft materials and fuel and its role in the psychogeography of later prehistoric people – it will try to see these landscapes differently. Having examined why and how people crossed into the bog, and what they took from it, the next chapter turns to what was given back. Chapter 5 considers the range of both

in Bog bodies
Catherine J. Frieman

historical development of technologies and practices, since imitation and innovation are entwined and continuous, only able to be distinguished through later abstractions. Yet, the idea that invention and imitation are, effectively, antonyms has fed directly into the archaeological discourse. So, for example, we have the case of skeuomorphism : meaningful imitation in one material of an object typically made in another. 3 The concept of skeuomorphism was developed to describe a sort of formal or aesthetic “lag,” in which new materials and technologies were shaped to

in An archaeology of innovation
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

volume and variation of the relevant phenomenon. The past is expressed in everything from doctoral theses to novels and role-playing games, from national archives to private photo albums, and from the Abu Simbel of antiquity (WHL 88, 1979) to the modern Sydney Opera House (WHL 166rev, 2007). The field is so large, and the questions are formulated so broadly, that the path lies open to many different and mutually contradictory replies. In addition, there is marked multiplicity in the division into disciplines and institutions, each with their own discourse or

in Heritopia
Duncan Sayer

with material culture: a spear placed in a grave or an heirloom brooch (Williams, 2007 ). Narratives can also take place at different scales using material and spatial foundations: burial under a mound, next to a partner, child, parent, grandparent or important person. As a result cemeteries are multi-generational histories, spatial representations of how a community described itself internally and to others. And, like other histories, dominant narratives were reinterpreted as each generation created its own discourses. Consequently, each cemetery is the unique and

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
Duncan Sayer

Introduction As archaeologists working in contemporary theoretical paradigms, we tend to look for the individual through discourses and cultural performances around personhood, material culture, gender or age (Fowler, 2004 ; Lucy, 1997 ; Martin, 2014 ; Felder, 2015 ). In part this research priority is driven by a twenty-first century perspective, which focuses on social questions through a lens of contemporary individualism. However, the individual may not always have been created within this frame. Who is the individual within a historic lineage, a large

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
Re-thinking Ludwik Fleck’s concept of the thought-collective according to the case of Serbian archaeology
Monika Milosavljević

critical analysis of discourse found in reviews from the prominent Serbian archaeological journal Starinar (The Antiquarian) from the years 1950 to 1960 will be carried out in order to better understand the changes experienced in the archaeological community of that time. In the first issue of the new series of Starinar (1950), Garašanin ROBERTS 9781526134554 PRINT.indd 27 03/12/2019 08:56 28 Communities and knowledge production in archaeology reviews the fourth edition of The Dawn of European Civilisation from 1947, a quarter of a century after the first edition

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology