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Penny Summerfield and Corinna Peniston-Bird

The evaluation of membership of the Home Guard in such accounts was positive. Grey called it ‘a most worthwhile experience’, and Tex Laws, who joined the Home Guard as a 17–year-old Post Office messenger-boy in Battersea in 1941, wrote: ‘The experience of comradeship and joint effort by fellow workers was well worthwhile; we were in this together and doubtless would have done our bit if required.’11 The reiteration of phrases such as ‘doing your bit’ and ‘all in it together’ suggests that in these cases the dominant historical discourse supplied ‘the very terms by

in Contesting home defence
John McLeod

nationalism often faced two problems: the complicity of national liberation movements in Western myth-making, and the complications caused by the fact that many occupants of colonial lands did not possess a sense of (to use Benedict Anderson’s phrase) ‘deep, horizontal comradeship’ prior to the advent of colonial government. The production of a unified imaginary community can be both nationalism’s greatest strength and its ultimate weakness. Although the myth of the nation might function as a valuable resource in uniting a people in opposition to colonialism, it often does

in Beginning postcolonialism (second edition)
FANY service after the Armistice 1918–19
Janet Lee

take was a little more optimistic as she saw the stumps of trees in No Man’s Land starting to sprout leaves again. Driving away from the Front line, the trees increased: ‘How hopeful the world seemed to be with the young greenery and the fruit trees which lined so many miles of the road, in full blossom. Surely’, she wrote, ‘all the sacrifice and effort and ugliness must have been worthwhile’.24 As Hutchinson reflected back on her service she wrote that her account of her FANY life failed to portray the most important aspect of all: ‘the pure comradeship’ between all

in War girls
Abstract only
Celia Hughes

socialist men were bound together by a shared identity of class, enthusiasm for newly discovered Marxist ideas, political debate, activity and 9780719091940_4_002.indd 91 11/12/14 2:28 PM 92 Young lives on the Left cultural tastes. The process of being collectively active and learning how to be activists fostered the bonds of comradeship. In the run-up to the 1964 general election Alan Watts attended a meeting at Finsbury town hall where he and his friends clashed with far-right supporters: I thought whatever happens I’m going to go in. So we got into this meeting

in Young lives on the Left
Jeffrey Richards

with celebrations of the army, often in an imperial context, with works like Tennyson’s Charge of the Heavy Brigade , Sir Francis Doyle’s Private of the Buffs and The Red Thread of Honour , Kipling’s Ballad of East and West and Henley’s own Last Post and Pro Rege Nostro. The binding themes of the collection are service, sacrifice, comradeship, heroism and death

in Popular imperialism and the military 1850–1950
John McLeod

). This is because ‘the members of even the smallest nation will never know most of their fellow-members, meet them, or even hear of them, yet in the minds of each lives an image of their communion’ (p. 6). Individuals come to think they are part of a greater collective, that they share a ‘deep, horizontal comradeship’ (p. 7) with many others. In a similar vein Timothy Brennan points out in his essay ‘The National Longing for Form’ (in Nation and Narration , ed. Homi K. Bhabha, Routledge, 1990 , pp. 44–70) that the nation refers ‘both to the modern nation-state and

in Beginning postcolonialism (second edition)
Jonathan Atkin

, ‘no man can be satisfied with the idea that war will be one of the permanent moral agencies of the world’, the rush to arms also possessed a ‘nobler aspect’: that of comradeship, men marching as brothers and ‘the spirit of subordination of the individual to the common life’.13 One of Gilbert Cannan’s principal themes was this threat, as he perceived it, to the role of the individual within the State posed by that state at war, a war waged against other states and also, in effect, on some of its own citizens. He began a chapter in Freedom on ‘The Man in the Street

in A war of individuals
Jeffrey Richards

strongly reflected a set of regular themes: love (treated as romance), marriage (treated as a trap and a disaster), work (and how to avoid it), city life, food and drink, clothes and holidays. The values celebrated were comradeship, patriotism, luck and fatalism, a mild anti-authoritarianism, defined gender roles and the idea of an immutable social order. 1 Dave Russell suggests that music hall

in Imperialism and music
Jonathan Atkin

succumb to the ‘inner blight’, the fear of being afraid which swallowed Bowen. Raven’s difficulties were of a more focused and specific nature; he found the almost entire lack of intellectual or like-minded spiritual comradeship in the army hard to bear, and he longed constantly for letters from home, the bonds with the ‘sweeter and saner’ life he remembered. Meanwhile, his growing hatred of the war was based upon physical hardship and mental exhaustion, but there also existed a friction, as he himself recognised, in spiritual terms. Raven began to see the conflict as a

in A war of individuals
Abstract only
Thomas Linehan

bonds. Linehan 00 2 13/6/07 11:26 Page 2 Communism in Britain 1920–39 These relationships often had an emotional pull as recruits felt the warmth of deep comradeship and belonging that came from the collective, shared experience of political struggle. A communist life could also impart a sense of being a part of a wider historical pattern while, in another personal register, it could bestow on recruits that feeling of belonging to the wider community of the world communist diaspora. Communists found that they were fully engaged in a life which aimed to cater

in Communism in Britain 1920–39