Search results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 44 items for :

  • "Julius Caesar" x
  • Manchester Literature Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Petrarch’s Triumphs and the Elizabethan icon
Heather Campbell

affair involving several triumphal cars and representations of St Prospero, various cherubim and angels, Justice, Julius Caesar, and the seven Virtues. The wedding of Lucrezia Borgia to Alfonso d’Este in Rome in 1501 was graced by several triumphal processions, including one representing Petrarch’s triumph of Scipio Africanus. And the entry of Louis XII into Milan included an

in Goddesses and Queens
Abstract only
James Doelman

Renaissance Texts and Studies (Binghamton, NY: Center for Medieval & Early Renaissance Studies, 1985), pp. 638–44, p. 638. He describes the elder Scaliger (Julius Caesar) as ‘a major exponent of epigrammatic sequences’ (640) without giving a reference. 67 Reynolds, Epigrammata (1611). 68 Niccols, The Furies, sig. A3r. Epigrams in print187 69 Charles Cathcart, ‘John Davies of Hereford, Marston, and Hall’, Ben Jonson Journal, 17(2010), pp. 242–8, p. 243. 70 Jonson, ‘To All to Whom I Write’, Ep. 9. 71 Partridge, ‘Jonson’s Epigrammes: The Named and the Nameless’, p. 155. 72

in The epigram in England, 1590–1640
Metaphor and mental space in Ralegh’s History of the World
Michael Booth

miseries’. Julius Caesar, IV.iii.218–21. The boat departing at high tide will get you clear of the shoals. Here too, there is a compression of time to the small scale of one tidal cycle. What differs is the mapping of roles in the tidal scenario. In Raleigh’s figure, the ebbing tide is one’s life itself, one’s failing energy. In Shakespeare’s, the tide is a moving target, a passing opportunity that one must move energetically to exploit. MUP_Armitage_Ralegh.indd 211 07/10/2013 14:09 212 Michael Booth (b) overwhelms the integration principle that would otherwise

in Literary and visual Ralegh
Rewriting Shakespeare in A Poem upon the Death of O. C.
Alex Garganigo

. Margoliouth, Legouis, Donald Friedman, and Nigel Smith have caught allusions to Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, Romeo and Juliet, King Lear, and Henry V in other parts of the poem.9 But no one seems to have noticed that ‘I saw him dead’ is a direct quotation of Hal’s startled response to Falstaff’s rising from the dead in Henry IV, Part 1. Shortly after Douglas appears to have slain Falstaff in Act 5, Prince John sees Falstaff alive and asks Hal, ‘Did you not tell me this fat man was dead?’ Hal insists, ‘I did, I saw him dead, / Breathless and bleeding on the ground

in Texts and readers in the Age of Marvell
Abstract only
Warren Oakley

. Colman – honest. How can we be sure that he is always to be honest?’ With every use of the word, it sounded increasingly hollow. It was a rhetorical ploy from the ancient world that Wedderburn would have discovered as a schoolboy at Dalkeith, a way of assassinating someone’s character straight out of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. He continued to chip away at the certainty of Colman’s integrity. ‘If there are no curbs placed upon him, he might do the most absurd things,’ Wedderburn speculated. With the authority that he assumed, ‘he might take the whole wardrobe up to

in Thomas ‘Jupiter’ Harris
Ralegh and the call to arms
Andrew Hiscock

Kempe, The Education of Children (1588), sig. D1r. This contention might be compared with that of Ralegh himself: ‘it is well knowne, that Rome (or perhaps all the world besides) had never nay so brave a Commander in war as Julius Caesar: and that no Roman armie was comparable unto that which served under the same Caesar.’ See History, 5.1.1.263. 19 I am indebted for these references to Rapple, Martial Heroism, 80–1. 20 For an age which had been profoundly (and violently) exercised by a prolonged interrogation of Early Stuart sovereignty, an indication of Ralegh

in Literary and visual Ralegh
Yvette Hutchison

associated the title of the song with Bush’s foreign policy, equating ‘Let the dogs out’ with ‘Let slip the dogs of war’, in Marc Antony’s speech in Shakespeare’s ‘Julius Caesar’, www.phrases.org.uk/ bulletin_board/49/messages/1123.html, accessed 25/1/12. 39 For example, the debates as to whether ancient Egypt was Grecian, African or Arabic, and today whether it is part of the Arabic or African world. African Renaissance and the ‘rainbow nation’ 167 cult it is to separate histories and mythologies from local contemporary politics, as we see in the way the Timbuktu

in South African performance and archives of memory
Syrithe Pugh

Chapters 1 and 2 – Vives’ identification of Daphnis as Christ and Servius’ identification of Daphnis as Julius Caesar. In his hymn to the newly deified Daphnis, Virgil’s Menalcas institutes a cult, teaching his community how to worship the new god. (More than half of his song (ll. 65–80) is devoted to the altars he will set up and the annual feasts he will institute in Daphnis’ honour.) In this he resembles Colin, especially when viewed through the lens of Vives’ Christian interpretation, by which Daphnis is in fact the same god represented by Colin’s Cupid under a

in Spenser and Virgil
Abstract only
James Doelman

from the Greek Anthology which was ascribed to Plato (a love one, at that!) and one from the Anthologia Latina frequently fathered upon Julius Caesar, Augustus or Germanicus. Fitzgerald recounts an anecdote from Macrobius, where Augustus turns the tables and presents a Greek epigram to a poet expecting patronage,95 and Suetonius wrote of that same emperor that he had a book of epigrams, ‘which he composed for the most part at the time of the bath’.96 Fallen royal favourites were particularly likely to have such poems attributed to them. The Earl of Essex was the

in The epigram in England, 1590–1640
Warren Oakley

world of Julius Caesar or the primitive Scotland of Macbeth – those materials had been the triumph of his art.20 With an air of resignation, Kemble would write a terse, matter-of-fact note in his journal later that day: This morning, between four and five o’clock, a fire broke out in Covent Garden Theatre which, in less than two hours time, consumed it to the ground. We have [?] not been able to discover the cause of this misfortune.21 The fire should not have been a cause of great surprise. Despite housing irreplaceable treasures, there was a merciless inevitability

in Thomas ‘Jupiter’ Harris