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David Larsson Heidenblad

, the two women discussed what the West could learn from India. 16 The article about the ongoing population explosion was far more censorious. Soller stressed that India’s population was growing by one million people a month, which she said was an untenable situation. All measures to improve people’s living conditions ‘will be eaten up by the rising excess population’, unless ‘the measures are specifically focused on family planning’. So far, though, all campaigns had been ineffective. Despite the fact that over a million

in The environmental turn in postwar Sweden
The politics of military intervention in Iraq
Aaron Edwards

the wake of the 2003 invasion the British once again established a training mission in the area. Yet, the negotiated truce with the militants did not signal the end of attacks against the Contingency Operating Base (COB) in Basra, which adapted its defences to counter daily bombardments from rockets and mortars. The strength of opposition within the city itself represented a microcosm of a much more widespread socio-political phenomenon that had grown up over many years. As Gilles Kepel argued: Twenty years earlier, the population explosion in the Muslim world had

in Defending the realm?
The Guide to The Painter of Signs
John Thieme

mistaken to see Daisy as a surrogate for Indira Gandhi, when Raman thinks of her as a potent female ruler, reflecting that, ‘In her previous incarnation, she must have been Queen Victoria, or in a still earlier incarnation, Rani Jhansi, the warrior queen of Indian history’ (PS 65),81 there is a hint of such an identification. Earlier in what could be seen as a comic response to Mrs Gandhi’s attempt to curb the population explosion through wholesale vasectomies,82 he has thought that, ‘If she were a despotic queen of ancient days, she would have ordered the sawing off of

in R.K. Narayan
Neil Macmaster

confronting Algeria was not, he argued, the consequence of an exploitative colonial system and France had since 1830 brought enormous benefits to a primitive society wracked by tribal wars, disease and famine. Algeria did face major problems of poverty and unemployment but these were not caused by colonialism but rather reflected a classic problem of ‘under-development’ rooted in such inherent problems as infertile soils, lack of rainfall, a population explosion and other ‘natural’ or technical aspects. Since, claimed Soustelle, France invested more in Algeria than it

in Burning the veil
Abstract only
Europe and its Muslim minorities
Amikam Nachmani

accelerates’, Bloomberg (28 March 2012), reprinted in Haaretz, TheMarker (29 March 2012, Hebrew). Hichem Karoui, ‘Middle East-North Africa population explosion’, World Security Network Foundation (5 April 2005) (emphasis added). Tarek Sultan Al Essa, Board of Agility (a Kuwaiti logistics company), The World Economic Forum, Istanbul (28–29 September 2014), quoted in Jerusalem Post (1  October 2014), p. 8. Nikita Mehta, ‘World population to cross 11 billion by 2100: UN study’, Live Mint and Wall Street Journal (19 September 2014), www.livemint.com/Politics/xJbXw8wzQiKRuSlnj

in Haunted presents
Brian Lewis

building of strings of the famous two-up-two-down terraced bye-law houses that became ubiquitous in towns and cities in the late nineteenth century. But this housing could not keep pace with the urban population explosion and still left many of the older slums and rookeries intact. It was often prohibitively expensive for the underemployed, and at a density of forty houses per acre continued to cram a depressing number of tiny dwellings into a confined area, paving over much of the remaining green space. Usually in narrow, tunnelback formats to minimize frontage and

in ‘So clean’