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The passion and performance of contemporary football fandom

Since their emergence in Italy in 1968, ultras have become the most dominant style of football fandom in the world. Since its inception, the ultras style has spread from Southern Europe across North Africa to Northern and Eastern Europe, South East Asia and North America. This book argues that ultras are an important site of enquiry into understanding contemporary society. They are a passionate, politically engaged collective that base their identity around a form of consumption (football) that links to modern notions of identity like masculinity and nationalism. The book seeks to make a clear theoretical shift in studies of football fandom. While it sits in the body of literature focused on political mobilisations, social movements and hooliganism, it emphasises more fundamental sociological questions about group formation, notably collective performances and emotional relationships. By focusing on the common form of expression through the performance of choreographies, chants and sustained support throughout the match, this book shows how members build an emotional attachment to their club that valorises the colours and symbols of that team, whilst mobilising members against opponents. It does this through recognising the importance of gender, politics and violence to the expression of ultras fandom, as well as how this is presented on social media and within the stadium through specular choreographies.

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Rob Boddice

place within the corpus of masculinity studies, for the historian is not only trying to get at what the actors thought, but also at the structural element that the actors could not necessarily see. An essential part of such an approach is the acknowledgement that masculinity is not a fixed category, but a fluid one. Despite this, we should reserve a degree of circumspection with regard to the word ‘emotion’. Why? Some historians of emotion, among them Nicole Eustace and Barbara Rosenwein, have no problem in using the word ‘emotion’ as a master category. They

in The history of emotions
Affective piety in the eleventh-century monastery of John of Fécamp
Series: Artes Liberales
Author: Lauren Mancia

Scholars of the Middle Ages have long taught that highly emotional Christian devotion, often called ‘affective piety’, originated in Europe after the twelfth century, and was primarily practised by late medieval communities of mendicants, lay people, and women. As the first study of affective piety in an eleventh-century monastic context, this book revises our understanding of affective spirituality’s origins, characteristics, and uses in medieval Christianity.

Emotional monasticism: Affective piety at the eleventh-century monastery of John of Fécamp traces the early monastic history of affective devotion through the life and works of the earliest-known writer of emotional prayers, John of Fécamp, abbot of the Norman monastery of Fécamp from 1028 to 1078. The book examines John’s major work, the Confessio theologica; John’s early influences and educational background in Ravenna and Dijon; the emotion-filled devotional programme of Fécamp’s liturgical, manuscript, and intellectual culture, and its relation to the monastery’s efforts at reform; the cultivation of affective principles in the monastery’s work beyond the monastery’s walls; and John’s later medieval legacy at Fécamp, throughout Normandy, and beyond. Emotional monasticism will appeal to scholars of monasticism, of the history of emotion, and of medieval Christianity. The book exposes the early medieval monastic roots of later medieval affective piety, re-examines the importance of John of Fécamp’s prayers for the first time since his work was discovered, casts a new light on the devotional life of monks in medieval Europe before the twelfth century, and redefines how we should understand the history of Christianity.

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Rob Boddice

History departments around the world appear to have taken the ‘emotional turn’. 1 In the last decade, an astonishing number of books and articles, as well as centres for research, have appeared specifically to address emotions in history. 2 There are already a number of theoretical and methodological tools, generated by historians, that address what emotions are and what historians should do with them. Historians of emotions have engaged with – sometimes borrowing, sometimes abusing – other disciplines, most notably anthropology and the

in The history of emotions
Rob Boddice

Historical narratives, if we consider the sweep of historiography from, say, Ranke to Richard Evans, have tended to rely on a stark opposition when dealing with public matters. The remit of history was originally to document the dynamics of public life, and public life was the sphere of reason. There was no place for emotion, which derailed politics. Where it cropped up it was easily identifiable as an aberration: an unwelcome diversion that usually plunged polities into catastrophe. Strictly speaking, historical practice was bound up, for most of the

in The history of emotions
Rob Boddice

) historians or anthropologists, and that it is questioned by many biologists, neuroscientists and psychologists. But there is a strain of psychology that purports a universalism of expression, with profound implications for the epistemology of the emotions and a whole host of social and political ramifications. As we saw with the linguist Wierzbicka, the assertion that the corners of the mouth being raised (a smile) always means ‘I feel something good now’, permits a sweeping analysis of human nature – psychology, anatomy, physiology and the limits of culture – as well as

in The history of emotions
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Michael C. Schoenfeldt

Rejoice with them that do rejoice, and weep with them that weep. (Romans 12.15, Authorized Version) What gives an emotion a negative or positive charge? Is a positive emotion simply one that feels good to the subject? Or is it one that induces behaviors that are salutary for the subject? Perhaps it is an emotion that prompts behaviors that are beneficial for the subject's social or environmental habitat? What then renders an

in Positive emotions in early modern literature and culture
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Rob Boddice

Over the course of this book I have tried to gauge from where the history of emotions came, why it is important and where we are now. In various ways, especially with reference to the turn to the neurosciences, genetics and to the question of morality, I have tried to suggest the potential routes for our historiographical future. By way of conclusion I want to re-state what is at stake in the history of emotions, and to emphasise what must happen in the coming years if the approach (currently a plural here would be more appropriate) is to prove to be

in The history of emotions
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Cora Fox, Bradley J. Irish, and Cassie M. Miura

, and particularly the positive emotions connected to romantic love and marriage, is insistently at stake in Spenser's allegorical exploration of his own cultural moment. 2 And yet, until recently, positive emotions have received less attention in studies of Spenser and other early modern writers, even though, as the Garden of Adonis emblematizes, they are essential to this culture's ethical and theological discursive contexts. 3

in Positive emotions in early modern literature and culture
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Centralising emotions in football fandom
Mark Doidge, Radosław Kossakowski, and Svenja Mintert

Centralising emotions 43 2 It’s only a game? Centralising emotions in football fandom The hot summer sun is beating down as the rare heatwave continues across Britain. Fans arrive at the small stadium in shorts, T-shirts and sunglasses, ready to enjoy an afternoon’s football. It is the first match of the season. The pre-season friendlies have gone well under the new coach who has been working with the young team and now has the opportunity to put that hard work into action. Even though the World Cup in Russia made it feel that football had not gone away, in

in Ultras