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Rachel Stone and Charles West

This introduction puts the text into its early medieval context and explaining Hincmar's sometimes-dubious methods of argument. The book is a translation of the most significant source for the attempted divorce, a treatise known as De divortio Lotharii regis et Theutbergae reginae, written in 860 by Archbishop Hincmar of Rheims. It sheds much light on the Frankish world of its protagonists and on early medieval Europe in general. In 860 those supporting Lothar II's divorce were still able to discomfort Hincmar by drawing parallels between the trials of Ebbo and Theutberga; the matter was only finally settled in 868. The book offers eye-opening insight not only on the political wrangling of the time, but also on early medieval attitudes towards a host of issues including magic, penance, gender, the ordeal, marriage, sodomy, the role of bishops, and kingship.

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga
Abstract only
Paul Fouracre and Richard A. Gerberding

On the part played by plunder and tribute in the political economy of the Carolingian age see T. Reuter, ‘Plunder and Tribute in the Carolingian Empire’, Transactions of the Royal Historical Society , 5th series, 35 ( 1985 ), and T. Reuter, ‘The end of Carolingian military expansion’, in P. Godman and R. Collins (eds.), Charlemagne’s Heir (Oxford, 1990

in Late Merovingian France
Janet L. Nelson

. 1 ‘There’, i.e. Aachen, and ‘he’, i.e. Louis the Pious, are references back to the entry for 829 in the RFA. For the AB as the continuation of the RFA , see above, Introduction: 5. 2 On relations between Brittany and the Carolingian Empire, see Davies 1990; Smith 1992

in The Annals of St-Bertin
Rachel Stone and Charles West

This chapter contains the translated text ofDe divortio. It has several underlying sections, responding to the questions that Hincmar initially received. These sections were, however, further divided to make the twenty-three responses which appear in the manuscript. The original sections are as follows: the procedure at the councils of Aachen, rules on marriage, divorce and remarriage, the validity of ordeals, the next steps in Theutberga's case, the sodomy charge, Lothar's relationship with Waldrada and sorcery, Lothar's possibilities of remarriage, and the response of bishops towards appeals to them and the case of Engeltrude. De divortio also deals with seven further questions which Hincmar received six months after the first: who is able to judge the king, can the king avoid further judgement in the case, the case of Engeltrude, and the effects of communion with the king.

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga