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Jason Jacobs

playwrights, journalists, novelists, ­lawyers – ­in short, anyone who’d actually had a life outside the hothouse of our inbred industry. I figured I could always teach them the form of television writing. It wasn’t rocket science.’9 This is how he describes their first meeting: Fat Dave, as he referred to himself, presented as a typical college professor: eye glasses, somewhat overweight, tweed jacket, shirt and tie, ­khakis – ­almost a cliché of the college professor. David was deferential, but clearly bright, and creatively, we were immediately attracted to one another

in David Milch
John McGrath’s The Adventures of Frank
Lez Cooke

much an investigation into the creative potential of video effects technology as it was an inquiry into the claims made by Bridget Hitler in her journal. 3049 Experimental British Tele 112 16/5/07 08:02 Page 112 Experimental British television The Adventures of Frank, however, was the first television drama to use the image manipulation possibilities of Quantel in a self-consciously Brechtian manner, as distanciation devices to interrupt the narrative flow and encourage the viewer to see the drama not as a ‘window on the world’, but as a constructed piece of

in Experimental British television
Sylvie Magerstädt

, how can it manage to strike a balance between the two and achieve what Purser considered an impossible compromise? Analysing a number of other historical miniseries of this decade, De Vito and Tropea (2010: 7) argue that they ‘[provide] us with examples . . . that found deeply self-reflective, ironic, post-modernistic approaches to respond to and even escape from the dwindling creative opportunities of the 1990s’. While Hercules: The Legendary Journeys does not pursue the same high-culture credentials as the series discussed by De Vito and Tropea,11 it nevertheless

in TV antiquity
Abstract only
Sue Vice

Rosenthal Drama Scripts Collection, ‘A Study in the Development of James Joyce’, MS 286, 2/5/6 1953, p. 63). 8 ‘Introduction: In conversation with Jack Rosenthal’, in Jack Rosenthal, P’tang, Yang, Kipperbang and Other TV Plays, ed. Alison Leake, London: Longman 1984, p. vii. 9 Jack Rosenthal Drama Scripts Collection, 2/16/1. 10 Although Rosenthal describes his ‘horror’ at finding the same words of dialogue in his plays on re-reading them (‘Introduction: In conversation with Jack Rosenthal’, p. vi), this is a significant part of his creative method. For instance

in Jack Rosenthal
Sylvie Magerstädt

image’ (Wrigley, 2011). Yet, not all perceived these innovations as a positive development. Chris Dunkley (1979) in the Financial Times suggests that for him, the most ‘distracting of all was a whole collection of optical effects [with large] parts of the TV antiquity  65 small screen . . . masked off to show a single head in the opposite to a close-up and several scenes [that] seem to have been shot through the lid of one of those plastic tissue box covers’. This illustrates some of the difficulties that television producers faced when trying to balance creative

in TV antiquity
Sylvie Magerstädt

in turn generated a collection of fanfiction. In addition, new modes of consumption, such as binge watching and online-streaming enabled audiences to view and review their favourite parts of the show, picking up details and nuances previously missed. We can compare this tendency to the emergence of VCR technologies in previous decades, which not only facilitated viewing but also had a substantial impact on the creative outputs of film and television producers. Suddenly, writers and directors could rewatch old movies for inspiration and the postmodernist references

in TV antiquity
Exploring the words of young people
Sarah Leahy and Isabelle Vanderschelden

anything. It pleased me to mix the two different types of language. I love Marivaux’s language, and I love the language used by the young people today and find it inventive. It is a cultural mix. Its creativeness comes from its métissage . They bring new words and phrases from their own culture. It is a rich language […] the two types of language go

in Screenwriters in French cinema
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Dramaturge and mauvais esprit
Sarah Leahy and Isabelle Vanderschelden

briefly outline Spaak’s approach and attitude to screenwriting, and the role of genre in French cinema. Defining the métier Spaak cut his cinematic teeth as a member of Jacques Feyder’s creative team from the mid-1920s (alongside Marcel Carné, among others). A fellow-Belgian, Feyder had acquired the status of maître during the silent period

in Screenwriters in French cinema
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‘We must love one another or/and die?’
Nigel Mather

Trainspotting are shown as harbouring literary ambitions, in part to imbue their daily lives with a creative outlet which is not provided by their everyday work-roles in society. Between the summer of 2016 and the end of 2020, Britain was engaged in the protracted process of ending its membership of the European Union, while striving to obtain some form of workable model and framework for future economic and social relationships and interactions with the European community. In T2 Trainspotting , Renton and his accomplice, Simon (Jonny Lee Miller), are shown successfully

in Sex and desire in British films of the 2000s
Lez Cooke

nourishing creative talent in his part of the country. (Curran, 1970: 23) The new studios at Pebble Mill were officially opened on 10 November 1971, having eventually cost £7 million. Phil Sidey was appointed Head of Network Production Centre, Pebble Mill, and David Rose was appointed Head of English Regions Drama, a new department, with a brief to commission and produce regional television drama for the network. Having worked at the BBC for a number of years, in the Drama-Documentary Department and as the first producer on Z Cars, Rose was well qualified to be Head of

in A sense of place